John Milton Quotes

What wisdom can there be to choose, what continence to forbear without the knowledge of evil? He that can apprehend and consider vice with all her baits and seeming pleasures, and yet abstain, and yet distinguish, and yet prefer that which is truly better, he is the true warfaring Christian.
John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. Areopagitica: a Speech for the Liberty of Unlicensed Printing to the Parliament of England (1644).
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His legions, angel forms, who lay intranst Thick as autumnal leaves that strow the brooks In Vallombrosa, where th'Etrurian shades High overarcht imbowr.
John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. Paradise Lost (l. Bk. I, l. 301-304). FaBoPP. The Complete Poetry of John Milton. John T. Shawcross, ed. (1963, rev. ed. 1971) Doubleday.
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As good almost kill a man as kill a good book; who kills a man kills a reasonable creature, God's image; but he who destroys a good book, kills reason itself, kills the image of God, as it were in the eye.
John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. Areopagitica: a Speech for the Liberty of Unlicensed Printing to the Parliament of England (1644).
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". . . Me miserable! which way shall I fly Infinite wrath and infinite despair? Which way I fly is Hell; myself am Hell; And, in the lowest deep, a lower deep Still threat'ning to devour me opens wide, To which the Hell I suffer seems a Heaven.
John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. Paradise Lost (l. Bk. IV, l. 73-78). OBS. The Complete Poetry of John Milton. John T. Shawcross, ed. (1963, rev. ed. 1971) Doubleday.
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Behold now this vast city; a city of refuge, the mansion house of liberty, encompassed and surrounded with his protection; the shop of war hath not there more anvils and hammers waking, to fashion out the plates and instruments of armed justice in defence of beleaguered truth, than there be pens and hands there, sitting by their studious lamps, musing, searching, revolving new notions.
John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. Areopagitica: A Speech for the Liberty of Unlicensed Printing to the Parliament of England (1644). Describing London during the English Civil War.
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And when night Darkens the streets, then wander forth the sons Of Belial, flown with insolence and wine.
John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. Paradise Lost, bk. 1, l. 500-2 (1667).
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For books are not absolutely dead things, but do contain a potency of life in them to be as active as that soul was whose progeny they are; nay, they do preserve as in a vial the purest efficacy and extraction of that living intellect that bred them. I know they are as lively, and as vigorously productive, as those fabulous dragon's teeth; and being sown up and down, may chance to spring up armed men.
John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. Areopagitica: a Speech for the Liberty of Unlicensed Printing to the Parliament of England (1644).
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Him the Almighty Power Hurld headlong flaming from th' Ethereal Skie With hideous ruine and combustion down To bottomless perdition, there to dwell In Adamantine Chains and penal Fire, Who durst defie th' Omnipotent to Arms. Nine times the Space that measures Day and Night To mortal men, he with his horrid crew Lay vanquisht, rowling in the fiery Gulfe
John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. Paradise Lost (l. Bk. I, l. 44-52). . . The Complete Poetry of John Milton. John T. Shawcross, ed. (1963, rev. ed. 1971) Doubleday.
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Methinks I see in my mind a noble and puissant nation rousing herself like a strong man after sleep, and shaking her invincible locks. Methinks I see her as an eagle mewing her mighty youth, and kindling her undazzled eyes at the full midday beam.
John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. Areopagitica: a Speech for the Liberty of Unlicensed Printing to the Parliament of England (1644).
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Rather your dauntless virtue, whom the pain Of death denounced, whatever thing Death be, Deterred not from achieving what might lead To happier life, knowledge of Good and Evil? Of good, how just! Of evil-if what is evil Be real, why not known, since easier shunned?
John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. Paradise Lost (l. Bk. IX, l. 694-699). . . The Complete Poetry of John Milton. John T. Shawcross, ed. (1963, rev. ed. 1971) Doubleday.
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