John Ruskin Quotes

Remember that the most beautiful things in the world are the most usless; peacocks and lilies for instance.
John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. The Stones of Venice, vol. 1, ch. 2, sct. 17 (1851).
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It is not, truly speaking, the labour that is divided; but the men: divided into mere segments of men—broken into small fragments and crumbs of life, so that all the little piece of intelligence that is left in a man is not enough to make a pin, or a nail, but exhausts itself in making the point of a pin or the head of a nail.
John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. The Stones of Venice, vol. 2, ch. 6 (1851-1853). Of division of labor.
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I have not written in vain if I have heretofore done anything towards diminishing the reputation of the Renaissance landscape painting.
John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. The Stones of Venice, vol. I, ch. 1 (1851).
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It is perhaps the principal admirableness of the Gothic schools of architecture, that they receive the results of the labour of inferior minds; and out of fragments full of imperfection ... raise up a stately and unaccusable whole.
John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. The Stones of Venice, vol. II, ch. 6 (1853).
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No architecture is so haughty as that which is simple.
John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. The Stones of Venice, vol. 2, ch. 6 (1851-1853).
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All great art is the work of the whole living creature, body and soul, and chiefly of the soul.
John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. The Stones of Venice, vol. I, ch. 4 (1851).
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All things are literally better, lovelier, and more beloved for the imperfections which have been divinely appointed, that the law of human life may be Effort, and the law of human judgment, Mercy.
John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. The Stones of Venice, vol. II, ch. 6 (1853).
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The art which we may call generally art of the wayside, as opposed to that which is the business of men's lives, is, in the best sense of the word, Grotesque.
John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. The Stones of Venice, vol. III, ch. 3 (1853).
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Men were not intended to work with the accuracy of tools, to be precise and perfect in all their actions.
John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. The Stones of Venice, vol. II, ch. 6 (1853).
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We have much studied and much perfected, of late, the great civilized invention of the division of labour; only we give it a false name. It is not, truly speaking, the labour that is divided; but the men.
John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. The Stones of Venice, vol. II, ch. 6 (1853).
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