John Ruskin Quotes

It does not matter what the whip is; it is none the less a whip, because you have cut thongs for it out of your own souls.
John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. address, 1865, Royal Military Academy, repr. in The Works of John Ruskin, vol. 18, eds. E.T. Cook and Alexander Weddesburn (1905). lecture 3, sct. 119, Crown of Wild Olives (1865).
No person who is not a great sculptor or painter can be an architect. If he is not a sculptor or painter, he can only be a builder.
John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. Lectures on Architecture and Painting, 61, addenda (1853).
Life without industry is guilt, industry without art is brutality.
John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. Lectures on Art, lecture 3 (1870).
Mountains are the beginning and the end of all natural scenery.
John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. Modern Painters, vol. 4, pt. 5, sct. 20 (1856).
The higher a man stands, the more the word "vulgar" becomes unintelligible to him.
John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. Modern Painters, vol. 3, pt. 4, ch. 7, sct. 9 (1856).
They are good furniture pictures, unworthy of praise, and undeserving of blame.
John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. Modern Painters, vol. 3, pt. 1, sct. 5, ch. 5 (1856).
Mountains are to the rest of the body of the earth, what violent muscular action is to the body of man. The muscles and tendons of its anatomy are, in the mountain, brought out with force and convulsive energy, full of expression, passion, and strength.
John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. Modern Painters, vol. 1, pt. 2, sct. 4, ch. 1, par. 3 (1843).
He who has learned what is commonly considered the whole art of painting, that is, the art of representing any natural object faithfully, has as yet only learned the language by which his thoughts are to be expressed.
John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. Modern Painters I, pt. 1, sec. 1, ch. 2 (1843).
He is the greatest artist who has embodied, in the sum of his works, the greatest number of the greatest ideas.
John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. Modern Painters I, pt. 1, sec. 1, ch. 2 (1843).
It is in this power of saying everything, and yet saying nothing too plainly, that the perfection of art ... consists.
John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. Modern Painters I, pt. 2, sec. 5, ch. 3 (1843).