Jonathan Swift Quotes

Vain men delight in telling what Honours have been done them, what great Company they have kept, and the like; by which they plainly confess, that these Honours were more than their Due, and such as their Friends would not believe if they had not been told: Whereas a Man truly proud, thinks the greatest Honours below his Merit, and consequently scorns to boast. I therefore deliver it as a Maxim that whoever desires the Character of a proud Man, ought to conceal his Vanity.
Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), Anglo-Irish satirist. "Thoughts on Various Subjects," (1706).
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The most positive men are the most credulous.
Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), Anglo-Irish satirist. Thoughts on Various Subjects (1711).
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Ambition often puts Men upon doing the meanest offices; so climbing is performed in the same position with creeping.
Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), Anglo-Irish satirist. Thoughts on Various Subjects (1711).
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We have just enough religion to make us hate, but not enough to make us love one another.
Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), Anglo-Irish satirist. repr. in Jonathan Swift: A Critical Edition of the Major Works, eds. Angus Ross and David Woolley (1984). "Various Thoughts Moral and Diverting," Miscellanies in Prose and Verse (1711).
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Censure is the tax a man pays to the public for being eminent.
Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), Anglo-Irish satirist. repr. in Jonathan Swift: A Critical Edition of the Major Works, eds. Angus Ross and David Woolley (1984). "Various Thoughts Moral and Diverting," Miscellanies in Prose and Verse (1711).
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Fair Liberty was all his cry; For her he stood prepared to die; For her he boldly stood alone; For her he oft exposed his own.
Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), Anglo-Irish poet, satirist, clergyman. Verses on the Death of Doctor Swift (l. 15-18). . . The Complete Poems [Jonathan Swift]. Pat Rogers, ed. (1983) Penguin Books.
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He never courted men in station Nor persons had in admiration; Of no man's greatness was afraid, Because he sought for no man's aid.
Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), Anglo-Irish poet, satirist, clergyman. Verses on the Death of Doctor Swift (l. 15-18). . . The Complete Poems [Jonathan Swift]. Pat Rogers, ed. (1983) Penguin Books.
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As with a moral view designed To cure the vices of mankind; His vein, ironically grave, Exposed the fool, and lashed the knave;
Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), Anglo-Irish poet, satirist, clergyman. Verses on the Death of Doctor Swift (l. 15-18). . . The Complete Poems [Jonathan Swift]. Pat Rogers, ed. (1983) Penguin Books.
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'He hardly drinks a pint of wine, And that, I doubt, is no good sign. His stomach too begins to fail: Last year we thought him strong and hale, But now, he's quite another thing; I wish he may hold out till spring.' Then hug themselves, and reason thus; \'It is not yet so bad with us.'
Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), Anglo-Irish poet, satirist, clergyman. Verses on the Death of Doctor Swift (l. 15-18). . . The Complete Poems [Jonathan Swift]. Pat Rogers, ed. (1983) Penguin Books.
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For poetry, he's past his prime, He takes an hour to find a rhyme; His fire is out, his wit decayed, His fancy sunk, his muse a jade. I'd have him throw away his pen, But there's no talking to some men.
Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), Anglo-Irish poet, satirist, clergyman. Verses on the Death of Doctor Swift (l. 15-18). . . The Complete Poems [Jonathan Swift]. Pat Rogers, ed. (1983) Penguin Books.
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