Jonathan Swift Quotes

Had he but spared his tongue and pen He might have rose like other men; But power was never in his thought, And wealth he valued not a groat;
Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), Anglo-Irish poet, satirist, clergyman. Verses on the Death of Doctor Swift (l. 15-18). . . The Complete Poems [Jonathan Swift]. Pat Rogers, ed. (1983) Penguin Books.
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Faith! he must make his stories shorter Or change his comrades once a quarter.
Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), Anglo-Irish satirist. "Verses on the Death of Dr. Swift."
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What poet would not grieve to see His brother write as well as he? But rather than they should excel, He'd wish his rivals all in Hell.
Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), Anglo-Irish satirist. repr. In The Poems of Jonathan Swift, ed. H. Williams (1958). Verses on the Death of Dr Swift, l. 31-4 (1731).
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In church your grandsire cut his throat; To do the job too long he tarried: He should have had my hearty vote To cut his throat before he married.
Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), Anglo-Irish satirist. Verses on the Upright Judge (written 1724), published in The Poems of Jonathan Swift, ed. H. Williams (1958).
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But you think ... that it is time for me to have done with the world, and so I would if I could get into a better before I was called into the best, and not die here in a rage, like a poisoned rat in a hole.
Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), Anglo-Irish satirist. Letter, March 21, 1729, to statesman and author Viscount Bolingbroke.
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Triumphant Tories, and desponding Whigs, Forget their feuds, and join to save their wigs.
Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), Anglo-Irish poet, satirist, clergyman. A Description of a City Shower (l. 41-42). . . The Complete Poems [Jonathan Swift]. Pat Rogers, ed. (1983) Penguin Books.
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Now in contiguous drops the flood comes down, Threat'ning with deluge this devoted town. To shops in crowds the daggled females fly, Pretend to cheapen goods, but nothing buy.
Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), Anglo-Irish poet, satirist, clergyman. A Description of a City Shower (l. 31-34). . . The Complete Poems [Jonathan Swift]. Pat Rogers, ed. (1983) Penguin Books.
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Sweeping from butcher's stalls, dung, guts, and blood, Drown'd puppies, stinking sprats, all drench'd in mud, Dead cats, and turnip-tops, come tumbling down the flood.
Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), Anglo-Irish poet, satirist, clergyman. A Description of a City Shower (l. 61-63). . . The Complete Poems [Jonathan Swift]. Pat Rogers, ed. (1983) Penguin Books.
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Careful observers may foretell the hour (By sure prognostics) when to dread a show'r. While rain depends, the pensive cat gives o'er Her frolics, and pursues her tail no more.
Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), Anglo-Irish poet, satirist, clergyman. A Description of a City Shower (l. 1-4). . . The Complete Poems [Jonathan Swift]. Pat Rogers, ed. (1983) Penguin Books.
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Duns at his lordship's gate began to meet; And brickdust Moll had screamed through half the street. The turnkey now his flock returning sees, Duly let out a-nights to steal for fees: The watchful bailiffs take their silent stands, And schoolboys lag with satchels in their hands.
Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), Anglo-Irish poet, satirist, clergyman. A Description of the Morning (l. 13-18). . . The Complete Poems [Jonathan Swift]. Pat Rogers, ed. (1983) Penguin Books.
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