Judith Viorst Quotes

Eventually we will learn that the loss of indivisible love is another of our necessary losses, that loving extends beyond the mother-child pair, that most of the love we receive in this world is love we will have to share—and that sharing begins at home, with our sibling rivals.
Judith Viorst (20th century), U.S. novelist and poet. Necessary Losses, ch. 6 (1986).
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A normal adolescent is so restless and twitchy and awkward that he can mange to injure his knee—not playing soccer, not playing football—but by falling off his chair in the middle of French class.
Judith Viorst (20th century), U.S. novelist and poet. Necessary Losses, ch. 10 (1986).
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Friends broaden our horizons. They serve as new models with whom we can identify. They allow us to be ourselves—and accept us that way. They enhance our self-esteem because they think we're okay, because we matter to them. And because they matter to us—for various reasons, at various levels of intensity—they enrich the quality of our emotional life.
Judith Viorst (20th century), U.S. novelist and poet. Necessary Losses, ch. 12 (1986).
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Close friends contribute to our personal growth. They also contribute to our personal pleasure, making the music sound sweeter, the wine taste richer, the laughter ring louder because they are there.
Judith Viorst (20th century), U.S. novelist and poet. Necessary Losses, ch. 12 (1986).
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Control cannot be called conscience until we are able to take it inside us and make it our own, until—in spite of the fact that the wrongs we have done or imagined will never be punished or known—we nonetheless feel that the clutch in the stomach, that chill upon the soul, that self-inflicted misery called guilt.
Judith Viorst (20th century), U.S. novelist and poet. Necessary Losses, ch. 9 (1986).
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A gorgeous example of denial is the story about the little girl who was notified that a baby brother or sister was on the way. She listened in thoughtful silence, then raised her gaze from her mother's belly to her eyes and said, "Yes, but who will be the new baby's mommy?"
Judith Viorst (20th century), U.S. novelist and poet. Necessary Losses, ch. 6 (1986).
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We can glut ourselves with how-to-raise children information . . . strive to become more mature and aware but none of this will spare us from the . . . inevitability that some of the time we are going to fail our children. Because there is a big gap between knowing and doing. Because mature, aware people are imperfect too. Or because some current event in our life may so absorb or depress us that when our children need us we cannot come through.
Judith Viorst (20th century), U.S. novelist and poet. Necessary Losses, ch. 14 (1986).
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If we are the younger, we may envy the older. If we are the older, we may feel that the younger is always being indulged. In other words, no matter what position we hold in family order of birth, we can prove beyond a doubt that we're being gypped.
Judith Viorst (20th century), U.S. novelist and poet. Necessary Losses, ch. 6 (1986).
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We have to divide mother love with our brothers and sisters. Our parents can help us cope with the loss of our dream of absolute love. But they cannot make us believe that we haven't lost it.
Judith Viorst (20th century), U.S. novelist and poet. Necessary Losses, ch. 6 (1986).
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We will have to give up the hope that, if we try hard, we somehow will always do right by our children. The connection is imperfect. We will sometimes do wrong.
Judith Viorst (20th century), U.S. novelist and poet. Necessary Losses, ch. 14 (1986).
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