Louis Macneice Quotes

O delicate walker, babbler, dialectician Fire, O enemy and image of ourselves,
Louis MacNeice (1907-1963), Anglo-Irish poet. Brother Fire (l. 13-14). . . New Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1950. Helen Gardner, ed. (1972) Oxford University Press.
(1) (3)
Thus were we weaned to knowledge of the Will That wills the natural world but wills us dead.
Louis MacNeice (1907-1963), Anglo-Irish poet. Brother Fire (l. 11-12). . . New Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1950. Helen Gardner, ed. (1972) Oxford University Press.
(2) (3)
I was the rector's son, born to the anglican order, Banned for ever from the candles of the Irish poor; The Chichesters knelt in marble at the end of a transept With ruffs about their necks, their portion sure.
Louis MacNeice (1907-1963), Anglo-Irish poet. Carrickfergus (l. 17-20). . . New Oxford Book of Irish Verse, The. Thomas Kinsella, ed. and tr. (1986) Oxford University Press.
(3) (3)
Let them not make me a stone and let them not spill me. Otherwise kill me.
Louis MacNeice (1907-1963), Anglo-Irish poet. Prayer before Birth (l. 38-39). . . Golden Treasury of the Best Songs & Lyrical Poems in the English Language. Francis Turner Palgrave, comp. With a fifth book selected by John Press. (5th ed., 1964) Oxford University Press.
(5) (3)
I am not yet born; O hear me. Let not the bloodsucking bat or the rat or the stoat or the club-footed ghoul come near me.
Louis MacNeice (1907-1963), Anglo-Irish poet. Prayer before Birth (l. 1-3). . . Golden Treasury of the Best Songs & Lyrical Poems in the English Language. Francis Turner Palgrave, comp. With a fifth book selected by John Press. (5th ed., 1964) Oxford University Press.
(5) (3)
I am not yet born; O fill me With strength against those who would freeze my humanity, would dragoon me into a lethal automaton would make me a cog in a machine, a thing with one face, a thing,
Louis MacNeice (1907-1963), Anglo-Irish poet. Prayer before Birth (l. 28-32). . . Golden Treasury of the Best Songs & Lyrical Poems in the English Language. Francis Turner Palgrave, comp. With a fifth book selected by John Press. (5th ed., 1964) Oxford University Press.
(5) (3)
World is crazier and more of it than we think, Incorrigibly plural.
Louis MacNeice (1907-1963), Anglo-Irish poet. Snow (l. 5-6). . . New Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1950. Helen Gardner, ed. (1972) Oxford University Press.
(6) (3)
But the ball is lost and the mallet slipped long since from the hands Under the running tap that are not the hands of a child.
Louis MacNeice (1907-1963), Anglo-Irish poet. Soap Suds (l. 15-16). . . New Oxford Book of Irish Verse, The. Thomas Kinsella, ed. and tr. (1986) Oxford University Press.
(1) (3)
This brand of soap has the same smell as once in the big House he visited when he was eight:
Louis MacNeice (1907-1963), Anglo-Irish poet. Soap Suds (l. 1-2). . . New Oxford Book of Irish Verse, The. Thomas Kinsella, ed. and tr. (1986) Oxford University Press.
(2) (2)
Down the road someone is practicing scales, The notes like little fishes vanish with a wink of tails,
Louis MacNeice (1907-1963), Anglo-Irish poet. Sunday Morning (l. 1-2). . . Norton Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. M. H. Abrams, general ed. (5th ed., 1986) W. W. Norton & Company.
(3) (2)