Louis Simpson Quotes

Like the shark, it contains a shoe. It must swim for miles through the desert Uttering cries that are almost human.
Louis Simpson (b. 1923), U.S. poet. American Poetry (l. 4-6). . . Norton Anthology of Modern Poetry, The. Richard Ellmann and Robert O'Clair, eds. (2d ed., 1988) W. W. Norton & Company.
(17) (3)
In my grandmother's house there was always chicken soup And talk of the old country—mud and boards, Poverty, The snow falling down and necks of lovers.
Louis Simpson (b. 1923), U.S. poet. A Story about Chicken Soup (l. 1-4). . . Poetry in English; an Anthology. M. L. Rosenthal, general ed. (1987) Oxford University Press.
(14) (2)
The sun is shining. The shadows of the lovers have disappeared. They are all eyes; they have some demand on me— They want me to be more serious than I want to be.
Louis Simpson (b. 1923), U.S. poet. A Story about Chicken Soup (l. 23-26). . . Poetry in English; an Anthology. M. L. Rosenthal, general ed. (1987) Oxford University Press.
(15) (0)
The watchers in their leopard suits Waited till it was time, And aimed between the belt and boot And let the barrel climb.
Louis Simpson (b. 1923), U.S. poet. Carentan O Carentan (l. 21-24). . . New Oxford Book of American Verse, The. Richard Ellmann, ed. (1976) Oxford University Press.
(11) (0)
Carentan O Carentan Before we met with you We never yet had lost a man Or known what death could do.
Louis Simpson (b. 1923), U.S. poet. Carentan O Carentan (l. 53-56). . . New Oxford Book of American Verse, The. Richard Ellmann, ed. (1976) Oxford University Press.
(3) (1)
For people may not know what they think about politics in the Balkans, or the vexed question of men and women, but everyone has a definite opinion about the flavour of shredded coconut.
Louis Simpson (b. 1923), U.S. poet. Chocolates (l. 18-22). . . Oxford Book of Contemporary Verse, The, 1945-1980. D. J. Enright, comp. (1980) Oxford University Press.
(2) (1)
My father in the night commanding No Has work to do.
Louis Simpson (b. 1923), U.S. poet. My Father in the Night Commanding No (l. 1-2). . . Norton Anthology of Modern Poetry, The. Richard Ellmann and Robert O'Clair, eds. (2d ed., 1988) W. W. Norton & Company.
(1) (1)
On the lawn at the villa— That's the way to start, eh, reader? We know where we stand—somewhere expensive—
Louis Simpson (b. 1923), U.S. poet. On the Lawn at the Villa (l. 1-4). . . Oxford Book of Contemporary Verse, The, 1945-1980. D. J. Enright, comp. (1980) Oxford University Press.
(1) (1)
It's complicated, being an American, Having the money and the bad conscience, both at the same time. Perhaps, after all, this is not the right subject for a poem.
Louis Simpson (b. 1923), U.S. poet. On the Lawn at the Villa (l. 14-16). . . Oxford Book of Contemporary Verse, The, 1945-1980. D. J. Enright, comp. (1980) Oxford University Press.
(2) (1)
I saw the best minds of my generation Reading their poems to Vassar girls, Being interviewed by Mademoiselle. Having their publicity handled by professionals. When can I go into an editorial office And have my stuff published because I'm weird? I could go on writing like this forever . . .
Louis Simpson (b. 1923), U.S. poet. Squeal (l. 28-34). . . Fireside Book of Humorous Poetry, The. William Cole, ed. (1959) Simon and Schuster.
(4) (1)