Marcus Tullius Cicero Quotes

Nothing is so difficult to believe that oratory cannot make it acceptable, nothing so rough and uncultured as not to gain brilliance and refinement from eloquence.
Marcus Tullius Cicero (106-43 B.C.), Roman orator, philosopher, statesman. 3.
Cannot people realize how large an income is thrift?
Marcus Tullius Cicero (106-43 B.C.), Roman orator, philosopher, statesman. 49.
Laws should be interpreted in a liberal sense so that their intention may be preserved.
Marcus Tullius Cicero (106-43 B.C.), Roman orator, philosopher, statesman. Celsus, Digesta, I, 3, 18.
No obligation to do the impossible is binding.
Marcus Tullius Cicero (106-43 B.C.), Roman orator, philosopher, statesman. Celsus, Digesta, L, 17.
To know the laws is not to memorize their letter but to grasp their full force and meaning.
Marcus Tullius Cicero (106-43 B.C.), Roman orator, philosopher, statesman. Celsus, Digesta, I, 3, 17.
What is impossible by the nature of things is not confirmed by any law.
Marcus Tullius Cicero (106-43 B.C.), Roman orator, philosopher, statesman. Celsus, Digesta, L, 17.
Friendship is nothing else than an accord in all things, human and divine, conjoined with mutual goodwill and affection, and I am inclined to think that, with the exception of wisdom, no better thing has been given to man by the immortal gods
Marcus Tullius Cicero (106-43 B.C.), Roman orator, philosopher, statesman. De Amicitia, 20.
Let arms yield to the toga, let the [victor's] laurel yield to the [orator's] tongue.
Marcus Tullius Cicero (106-43 B.C.), Roman orator, philosopher, statesman. De Consulatu Suo.
The well-known old remark of Cato, who used to wonder how two soothsayers could look one another in the face without laughing.
Marcus Tullius Cicero (106-43 B.C.), Roman orator, philosopher, statesman. De Divinatione, II, 51.
There is nothing so absurd but some philosopher has said it.
Marcus Tullius Cicero (106-43 BC), Roman orator, philosopher. De Divinatione, bk. 2, sct. 58 (45 B.C.).