Marge Piercy Quotes

... probably all of the women in this book are working to make part of the same quilt to keep us from freezing to death in a world that grows harsher and bleaker—where male is the norm and the ideal human being is hard, violent and cold: a macho rock. Every woman who makes of her living something strong and good is sharing bread with us.
Marge Piercy (b. 1936), U.S. poet, novelist, and political activist. As quoted in Mountain Moving Day, by Elaine Gill (1973). "This book" was a feminist collection of poetry by women.
(20) (8)
Loving feels lonely in a violent world, irrelevant to people burning like last year's weed with bellies distended, with fish throats agape and flesh melting down to glue. We can no longer shut out the screaming That leaks through the ventilation system ...
Marge Piercy (b. 1936), U.S. poet, novelist, and political activist. "Community," lines 1-6 (1969). Referring to television and photographic images of the Vietnam War, which was at its height when this was written. Piercy was a prominent activist in the antiwar movement.
(17) (8)
Remember that every son had a mother whose beloved son he was, and every woman had a mother whose beloved son she wasn't.
Marge Piercy (20th century), U.S. writer. "Doing It Differently," Circles on the Water (1892).
(24) (4)
The real writer is one who really writes. Talent is an invention like phlogiston after the fact of fire. Work is its own cure. You have to like it better than being loved.
Marge Piercy (b. 1936), U.S. poet and novelist. "For the Young Who Want To," lines 31-36 (1980).
(22) (6)
this quilt might be the only perfect artifact a woman would ever see, yet she did not doubt what we had forgotten, that out of her potatoes and colic, sawdust and blood she could create ...
Marge Piercy (b. 1936), U.S. poet, novelist, and political activist. "Looking at Quilts," lines 44-49 (1976).
(4) (1)
This life is a war we are not yet winning for our daughters' children. Don't do your enemies' work for them. Finish your own.
Marge Piercy (b. 1936), U.S. poet, novelist, and political activist. "Memo To: ... Subject:," lines 53-56 (1980). Directed to "female poets" and naming twenty strongly feminist women poets, this poem argued the importance of persevering in the face of problems and frustrations.
(9) (0)
Rape fattens on the fantasies of the normal male like a maggot in garbage.
Marge Piercy (b. 1936), U.S. poet, novelist, and political activist. "Rape Poem," lines 18-19 (1976).
(8) (2)
A new idea is rarely born like Venus attended by graces More commonly it's modeled of baling wire and acne. More commonly it wheezes and tips over.
Marge Piercy (b. 1936), U.S. poet, novelist, and political activist. "Rough Times," lines 20-22 (1976).
(5) (1)
We are trying to live as if we were an experiment conducted by the future
Marge Piercy (b. 1936), U.S. poet, novelist, and political activist. "Rough Times," lines 1-3 (1976). On women's trying to construct lives that break with traditional sex roles.
(7) (0)
This is the 184th Demonstration. ... What we do is not beautiful hurts no one makes no one desperate we do not break the panes of safety glass stretching between people on the street and the deaths they hire.
Marge Piercy (b. 1936), U.S. poet, novelist, and political activist. "The 184th Demonstration," lines 1, 27-31 (1968). On the countless demonstrations mounted to protest the United States' involvement in the Vietnam War; Piercy was a prominent activist in the antiwar movement.
(6) (1)