Marge Piercy Quotes

She never felt much in common with gay men; it was like telling her she ought to feel empathy with child molesters because they were both defined by the law as sexual deviants.
Marge Piercy (b. 1936), U.S. poet, novelist. The High Cost of Living, ch. 3 (1978). Referring to the character Leslie.
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when I work I am pure as an angel tiger and clear is my eye and hot my brain and silent all the whining grunting piglets of the appetites.
Marge Piercy (b. 1936), U.S. poet, novelist, and political activist. "The Moon is Always Female," lines 9-12 (1980).
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The politics of the exile are fever, revenge, daydream, theater of the aging convalescent. You wait in the wings and rehearse. You wait and wait.
Marge Piercy (b. 1936), U.S. poet, novelist, and political activist. "The Organizer's Bogeyman," lines 20-24 (1969). Written during the Vietnam War, on expulsion from an activist organization governed by radical political ideology. Piercy was prominent among the opponents of American involvement in that war.
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This nation is founded on blood like a city on swamps yet its dream has been beautiful and sometimes just that now grows brutal and heavy as a burned out star.
Marge Piercy (b. 1936), U.S. poet, novelist, and political activist. "The Peaceable Kingdom," lines 53-55 (1968). Written during the Vietnam War; Piercy was a prominent opponent of the United States' involvement in that war.
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Only when we break the mirror and climb into our vision, only when we are the wind together streaming and singing, only in the dream we become with our bones for spears, we are real at last and wake.
Marge Piercy (b. 1936), U.S. poet, novelist, and political activist. "The Provocation of the Dream," lines 81-85 (1976). Piercy was a prominent activist in the movement opposing the United States' involvement in the Vietnam War. These are the last lines in the last poem of her first post- Vietnam War collection, Living in the Open.
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The token woman carries a bouquet of hothouse celery and a stenographer's pad; she will take the minutes, perk the coffee, smile like a plastic daisy and put out the black cat of her sensuous anger to howl on the fence all night.
Marge Piercy (b. 1936), U.S. poet, novelist, and political activist. "The Token Woman," lines 4-9 (1976).
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I have no connections here; only gusty collisions, rootless seedlings forced into bloom, that collapse. ... I am the Visiting Poet: a real unicorn, a wind-up plush dodo, a wax museum of the Movement. People want to push the buttons and see me glow.
Marge Piercy (b. 1936), U.S. poet, novelist, and political activist. "Three Weeks in a State of Loneliness," lines 22-23, 28-30 (1976). On a "Visiting Poet" stint at the University of Kansas. Piercy had been a prominent activist in the movement opposing the United States' involvement in the Vietnam War and had written many political poems.
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