Matthew Arnold Quotes

France, famed in all great arts, in none supreme.
Matthew Arnold (1822-1888), British poet, critic. To a Republican Friend Continued (1849).
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But each day brings its petty dust Our soon-choked souls to fill, And we forget because we must, And not because we will.
Matthew Arnold (1822-1888), British poet, critic. Absence, st. 3 (1852).
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us burning plains, Bristled with cities, us the sea received.
Matthew Arnold (1822-1888), British poet, critic. A Dream (l. 36-37). . . Seven Centuries of Poetry; Chaucer to Dylan Thomas. A. N. Jeffares, ed. (1955) Longmans, Green & Company.
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One moment, on the rapid's top, our boat Hung poised —and then the darting river of Life (Such now, methought, it was), the river of Life, Loud thundering, bore us by; swift, swift it foamed, Black under cliffs it raced, round headlands shone.
Matthew Arnold (1822-1888), British poet, critic. A Dream (l. 30-34). . . Seven Centuries of Poetry; Chaucer to Dylan Thomas. A. N. Jeffares, ed. (1955) Longmans, Green & Company.
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Still bent to make some port he knows not where, Still standing for some false impossible shore.
Matthew Arnold (1822-1888), British poet, critic. A Summer Night, l. 68-9 (1852).
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As our actual present world ... shows itself more clearly—our world of an aristocracy materialised and null, a middle-class purblind and hideous, a lower class crude and brutal—we shall turn our eyes again, and to more purpose, upon this passionate and dauntless soldier of a forlorn hope.
Matthew Arnold (1822-1888), British poet, critic. "Byron," Essays in Criticism, Second Series (1888).
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The pursuit of perfection, then, is the pursuit of sweetness and light.... He who works for sweetness and light united, works to make reason and the will of God prevail.
Matthew Arnold (1822-1888), British poet, critic. Culture and Anarchy, ch. 1 (1869). These words recall Swift's evocation of mankind's "two noblest of things, which are sweetness and light." (See culture.).
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The working-class ... is now issuing from its hiding-place to assert an Englishman's heaven-born privilege of doing as he likes, and is beginning to perplex us by marching where it likes, meeting where it likes, bawling what it likes, breaking what it likes.
Matthew Arnold (1822-1888), British poet, critic. Culture and Anarchy, ch. 3 (1869).
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Our society distributes itself into Barbarians, Philistines and Populace; and America is just ourselves with the Barbarians quite left out, and the Populace nearly.
Matthew Arnold (1822-1888), British poet, critic. Culture and Anarchy, preface (1859). Arnold held that literature was of paramount importance for the education of the "Philistines."
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The discipline of the Old Testament may be summed up as a discipline teaching us to abhor and flee from sin; the discipline of the New Testament, as a discipline teaching us to die to it.
Matthew Arnold (1822-1888), British poet, critic. Culture and Anarchy, ch. 4 (1869).
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