Matthew Arnold Quotes

Yes! in sea of life enisled, With echoing straits between us thrown, Dotting the shoreless watery wild, We mortal millions live alone.
Matthew Arnold (1822-1888), British poet, critic. Switzerland (l. 1-4). . . Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1918. Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. (New ed., rev. and enl., 1939) Oxford University Press.
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Who ordered, that their longing's fire Should be, as soon as kindled, cooled? Who renders vain their deep desire?— A God, a God their severance ruled! And bade betwixt their shores to be The unplumbed, salt, estranging sea.
Matthew Arnold (1822-1888), British poet, critic. Switzerland (l. 19-24). . . Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1918. Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. (New ed., rev. and enl., 1939) Oxford University Press.
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Come away, away children; Come children, come down! The hoarse wind blows coldly; Lights shine in the town.
Matthew Arnold (1822-1888), British poet, critic. The Forsaken Merman (l. 18-21). . . Selected Poems and Prose [Matthew Arnold]. Allot, Miriam, ed. (1993) J.M. Dent.
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Come, dear children, let us away; Down and away below! Now my brothers call from the bay, Now the great winds shoreward blow, Now the salt tides seaward flow; Now the wild white horses play, Champ and chafe and toss in the spray.
Matthew Arnold (1822-1888), British poet, critic. The Forsaken Merman (l. 1-7). . . Selected Poems and Prose [Matthew Arnold]. Allot, Miriam, ed. (1993) J.M. Dent.
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If experience has established any one thing in this world, it has established this: that it is well for any great class and description of men in society to be able to say for itself what it wants, and not to have other classes, the so-called educated and intelligent classes, acting for it as its proctors, and supposed to understand its wants and to provide for them.... A class of men may often itself not either fully understand its wants, or adequately express them; but it has a nearer interest and a more sure diligence in the matter than any of its proctors, and therefore a better chance of success.
Matthew Arnold (1822-1888), British poet, critic. repr. In The Complete Prose Works of Matthew Arnold, vol. 9, ed. R.H. Super (1973). "The Future of Liberalism," Irish Essays and Others (1882).
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They out-talked thee, hissed thee, tore thee? Better men fared thus before thee;
Matthew Arnold (1822-1888), British poet, critic. The Last Word (l. 9-10). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
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Let the long contention cease! Geese are swans, and swans are geese. Let them have it how they will! Thou art tired; best be still.
Matthew Arnold (1822-1888), British poet, critic. "The Last Word," (1867).
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Charge once more, then, and be dumb! Let the victors, when they come, When the forts of folly fall, Find thy body by the wall!
Matthew Arnold (1822-1888), British poet, critic. The Last Word (l. 13-16). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
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With close-lipp'd Patience for our only friend, Sad Patience, too near neighbour to Despair.
Matthew Arnold (1822-1888), British poet, critic. The Scholar-Gipsy, st. 20 (1853).
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O life unlike to ours! Who fluctuate idly without term or scope, Of whom each strives, nor knows for what he strives, And each half lives a hundred different lives; Who wait like thee, but not, like thee, in hope.
Matthew Arnold (1822-1888), British poet, critic. The Scholar-Gipsy (l. 166-170). . . Selected Poems and Prose [Matthew Arnold]. Allot, Miriam, ed. (1993) J.M. Dent.
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