Born in 1883, Max Plowman became an established journalist and poet before he joined the Territorial Field Service on Christmas Eve in 1914. He was against war, but felt it his duty to join in the service.

After receiving a concussion at Albert, near the Somme battle ground, from a nearby exploding shell, Plowman was sent back to England to recover. There, at Bowhill Auxiliary, he penned two books: "A Lap Full of Seed" (poetry), and" The Right to Life", published anonymously, a protest against war.

Firmly against the continuation of war, he wrote to the adjutant of his batillion, demanding to leave, on the grounds of his dissaproval. After being arrested and confined to his quarters, Plowman recieved a court-martial in 1918, and was, luckily for him, relieved of service, thus avoiding jail.

Plowman then joined the Peace Pledge Union, founded by Dick Shepard, of which he was secretary from 1937 to 1939. Max Plowman published his book, "A Subtalern on the Somme", in the late 1920's, under the pen name Mark VII. Plowman died in 1941, and was buried at the Langham Chuch, in Essex.

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Max Plowman Poems

When It's Over

'Young soldier, what will you be
When it's all over?'
'I shall get out and across the sea,... more »

Her Beauty

I heard them say, "Her hands are hard as stone,"
And I remembered how she laid for me
The road to heaven. They said, "Her hair is grey."
Then I remembered how she once had thrown... more »

General Gordon, The Hero Of Khartoum

Alas! now o'er the civilised world there hangs a gloom
For brave General Gordon, that was killed in Khartoum,
He was a Christian hero, and a soldier of the Cross,
And to England his death will be a very great loss.... more »

Max Plowman Quotes

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