Michel de Certeau Quotes

Political organizations have slowly substituted themselves for the Churches as the places for believing practices.... Politics has once again become religious.
Michel de Certeau (1925-1986), French cultural theorist, critic. "An Archaeology: The Transits of Believing," ch. 13, The Practice of Everyday Life (1974).
Along with the lazy man ... the dying man is the immoral man: the former, a subject that does not work; the latter, an object that no longer even makes itself available to be worked on by others.
Michel de Certeau (1925-1986), French author and critic. "An Unthinkable Practice," ch. 14, The Practice of Everyday Life (1974).
The sick man is taken away by the institution that takes charge not of the individual, but of his illness, an isolated object transformed or eliminated by technicians devoted to the defense of health the way others are attached to the defense of law and order or tidiness.
Michel de Certeau (1925-1986), French author, critic. "An Unthinkable Practice," ch. 14, The Practice of Everyday Life (1974).
The media transforms the great silence of things into its opposite. Formerly constituting a secret, the real now talks constantly. News reports, information, statistics, and surveys are everywhere.
Michel de Certeau (1925-1986), French author, critic. "The Establishment of the Real," ch. 13, The Practice of Everyday Life (1974).
As a first approximation, I define "belief" not as the object of believing (a dogma, a program, etc.) but as the subject's investment in a proposition, the act of saying it and considering it as true.
Michel de Certeau (1925-1986), French author, critic. The Practice of Everyday Life, ch. 13 (1974).
New York has never learnt the art of growing old by playing on all its pasts. Its present invents itself, from hour to hour, in the act of throwing away its previous accomplishments and challenging the future. A city composed of paroxysmal places in monumental reliefs.
Michel de Certeau (1925-1986), French author, critic. The Practice of Everyday Life, ch. 7 (1974).