noah nomadic Quotes

If men do not keep on speaking terms with children, they cease to be men, and become merely machines for eating and for earning money.
John Updike (b. 1932), U.S. author, critic. "A Foreword for Younger Readers," Assorted Prose (1965).
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A healthy male adult bore consumes each year one and a half times his own weight in other people's patience.
John Updike (b. 1932), U.S. author, critic. Assorted Prose, "Confessions of a Wild Bore," (1965).
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An affair wants to spill, to share its glory with the world. No act is so private it does not seek applause.
John Updike (b. 1932), U.S. author, critic. Couples, ch. 2 (1968).
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It is not difficult to deceive the first time, for the deceived possesses no antibodies; unvaccinated by suspicion, she overlooks latenesses, accepts absurd excuses, permits the flimsiest patchings to repair great rents in the quotidian.
John Updike (b. 1932), U.S. author, critic. Couples, ch. 2 (1968).
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Every marriage tends to consist of an aristocrat and a peasant. Of a teacher and a learner.
John Updike (b. 1932), U.S. novelist, critic. Couples, ch. 1 (1968).
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By the time a partnership dissolves, it has dissolved.
John Updike (b. 1932), U.S. author, critic. Couples, ch. 5 (1968).
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The first breath of adultery is the freest; after it, constraints aping marriage develop.
John Updike (b. 1932), U.S. author, critic. Couples, ch. 5 (1968).
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The ball loved Flick. I saw him rack up thirty-eight or forty In one home game. His hands were like wild birds.
John Updike (b. 1932), U.S. novelist, poet. Ex-Basketball Player (l. 16-18). . . Collected Poems, 1953-1993 [John Updike]. (1993) Alfred A. Knopf.
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Flick stands tall among the idiot pumps— Five on a side, the old bubble-head style, Their rubber elbows hanging loose and low.
John Updike (b. 1932), U.S. novelist, poet. Ex-Basketball Player (l. 7-9). . . Collected Poems, 1953-1993 [John Updike]. (1993) Alfred A. Knopf.
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The Founding Fathers in their wisdom decided that children were an unnatural strain on parents. So they provided jails called schools, equipped with tortures called an education. School is where you go between when your parents can't take you and industry can't take you.
John Updike (b. 1932), U.S. author, critic. George Caldwell, in The Centaur, ch. 4 (1963).
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