noah nomadic Quotes

Being naked approaches being revolutionary; going barefoot is mere populism.
John Updike (b. 1932), U.S. novelist, critic. repr. In Hugging the Shore (1983). "Going Barefoot," On the Vineyard (1980).
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I love my government not least for the extent to which it leaves me alone.
John Updike (b. 1932), U.S. author, critic. testimony, Jan. 30, 1978, given before the Subcommittee on Select Education of the House of Representatives Committee on Education and Labor, Boston. Hugging the Shore, appendix (1983).
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Writing criticism is to writing fiction and poetry as hugging the shore is to sailing in the open sea.
John Updike (b. 1932), U.S. author, critic. Hugging the Shore (collection of essays), foreword.
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I think "taste" is a social concept and not an artistic one. I'm willing to show good taste, if I can, in somebody else's living room, but our reading life is too short for a writer to be in any way polite. Since his words enter into another's brain in silence and intimacy, he should be as honest and explicit as we are with ourselves.
John Updike (b. 1932), U.S. author, critic. repr. In Hugging the Shore, appendix (1984). interview, New York Times Book Review (Apr. 10, 1977).
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It rots a writer's brain, it cretinises you. You say the same thing again and again, and when you do that happily you're well on the way to being a cretin. Or a politician.
John Updike (b. 1932), U.S. author, critic. interview, in Observer (London, Aug. 30, 1987). Interviewed by novelist Martin Amis.
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Customs and convictions change; respectable people are the last to know, or to admit, the change, and the ones most offended by fresh reflections of the facts in the mirror of art.
John Updike (b. 1932), U.S. author, critic. New Yorker (July 30, 1990).
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Now that I am sixty, I see why the idea of elder wisdom has passed from currency.
John Updike (b. 1932), U.S. author, critic. New Yorker (November 1992).
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Sex is like money; only too much is enough.
John Updike (b. 1932), U.S. author, critic. Piet Hanema, in Couples, ch. 5 (1968).
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To be President of the United States, sir, is to act as advocate for a blind, venomous, and ungrateful client; still, one must make the best of the case, for the purposes of Providence.
John Updike (b. 1932), U.S. author, critic. President James Polk, in Buchanan Dying, act 2 (1974).
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America is a vast conspiracy to make you happy.
John Updike (b. 1932), U.S. author, critic. Problems, "How to Love America and Leave it at the Same Time," (1980).
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