noah nomadic Quotes

I would rather have as my patron a host of anonymous citizens digging into their own pockets for the price of a book or a magazine than a small body of enlightened and responsible men administering public funds. I would rather chance my personal vision of truth striking home here and there in the chaos of publication that exists than attempt to filter it through a few sets of official, honorably public-spirited scruples.
John Updike (b. 1932), U.S. author, critic. Testimony, January 30, 1978, given before the Subcommittee on Select Education of the House of Representatives Committee on Education and Labor, Boston, Massachusetts. Published in Hugging the Shore (1983).
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Truth should not be forced; it should simply manifest itself, like a woman who has in her privacy reflected and coolly decided to bestow herself upon a certain man.
John Updike (b. 1932), U.S. author, critic. Self-Consciousness: Memoirs, ch. 6 (1989).
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Our brains are no longer conditioned for reverence and awe. We cannot imagine a Second Coming that would not be cut down to size by the televised evening news, or a Last Judgment not subject to pages of holier-than-Thou second- guessing in The New York Review of Books.
John Updike (b. 1932), U.S. author, critic. Self-Consciousness: Memoirs, ch. 6 (1989).
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What more fiendish proof of cosmic irresponsibility than a Nature which, having invented sex as a way to mix genes, then permits to arise, amid all its perfumed and hypnotic inducements to mate, a tireless tribe of spirochetes and viruses that torture and kill us for following orders?
John Updike (b. 1932), U.S. author, critic. Self-Consciousness: Memoirs, ch. 6 (1989).
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Looking foolish does the spirit good. The need not to look foolish is one of youth's many burdens; as we get older we are exempted from more and more, and float upward in our heedlessness, singing Gratia Dei sum quod sum.
John Updike (b. 1932), U.S. author, critic. Self-Consciousness: Memoirs, ch. 6 (1989). Gratia Dei sum quod sum ("Thanks be to God that I am what I am")Mone of the epigraphs of Updike's volume of memoirs—is inscribed on the tomb of Bishop West of Ely in Ely Cathedral, England.
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The yearning for an afterlife is the opposite of selfish: it is love and praise for the world that we are privileged, in this complex interval of light, to witness and experience.
John Updike (b. 1932), U.S. author, critic. Self-Consciousness: Memoirs, ch. 6 (1989).
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When we try in good faith to believe in materialism, in the exclusive reality of the physical, we are asking our selves to step aside; we are disavowing the very realm where we exist and where all things precious are kept—the realm of emotion and conscience, of memory and intention and sensation.
John Updike (b. 1932), U.S. author, critic. Self-Consciousness: Memoirs, ch. 6 (1989).
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The essential self is innocent, and when it tastes its own innocence knows that it lives for ever.
John Updike (b. 1932), U.S. author, critic. Self-Consciousness: Memoirs, ch. 1 (1989).
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Among the repulsions of atheism for me has been its drastic uninterestingness as an intellectual position. Where was the ingenuity, the ambiguity, the humanity (in the Harvard sense) of saying that the universe just happened to happen and that when we're dead we're dead?
John Updike (b. 1932), U.S. author, critic. Self-Consciousness: Memoirs, ch. 4 (1989).
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Celebrity is a mask that eats into the face. As soon as one is aware of being "somebody," to be watched and listened to with extra interest, input ceases, and the performer goes blind and deaf in his overanimation. One can either see or be seen.
John Updike (b. 1932), U.S. author, critic. Self-Consciousness: Memoirs, ch. 6 (1989).
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