noah nomadic Quotes

Celebrity is a mask that eats into the face. As soon as one is aware of being "somebody," to be watched and listened to with extra interest, input ceases, and the performer goes blind and deaf in his overanimation. One can either see or be seen.
John Updike (b. 1932), U.S. author, critic. Self-Consciousness: Memoirs, ch. 6 (1989).
Existence itself does not feel horrible; it feels like an ecstasy, rather, which we have only to be still to experience.
John Updike (b. 1932), U.S. author, critic. Self-Consciousness: Memoirs, ch. 6 (1989).
The guarantee that our self enjoys an intended relation to the outer world is most, if not all, we ask from religion. God is the self projected onto reality by our natural and necessary optimism. He is the not-me personified.
John Updike (b. 1932), U.S. author, critic. Self-Consciousness: Memoirs, ch. 6 (1989).
Dreams come true; without that possibility, nature would not incite us to have them.
John Updike (b. 1932), U.S. author, critic. Self-Consciousness: Memoirs, ch. 3 (1989).
To say that war is madness is like saying that sex is madness: true enough, from the standpoint of a stateless eunuch, but merely a provocative epigram for those who must make their arrangements in the world as given.
John Updike (b. 1932), U.S. author, critic. Self-Consciousness: Memoirs, ch. 4 (1989).
Rain is grace; rain is the sky condescending to the earth; without rain, there would be no life.
John Updike (b. 1932), U.S. author, critic. Self-Consciousness: Memoirs, ch. 1 (1989).
Religion enables us to ignore nothingness and get on with the jobs of life.
John Updike (b. 1932), U.S. author, critic. Self-Consciousness: Memoirs, ch. 6 (1989).
Bankruptcy is a sacred state, a condition beyond conditions, as theologians might say, and attempts to investigate it are necessarily obscene, like spiritualism. One knows only that he has passed into it and lives beyond us, in a condition not ours.
John Updike (b. 1932), U.S. author, critic. "The Bankrupt Man," Hugging the Shore (1983).
For male and female alike, the bodies of the other sex are messages signaling what we must do—they are glowing signifiers of our own necessities.
John Updike (b. 1932), U.S. author, critic. repr. In The Best American Essays, 1991, ed. Joyce Carol Oates (1991). "The Female Body," Michigan Quarterly Review (1990).
Facts are generally overesteemed. For most practical purposes, a thing is what men think it is. When they judged the earth flat, it was flat. As long as men thought slavery tolerable, tolerable it was. We live down here among shadows, shadows among shadows.
John Updike (b. 1932), U.S. author, critic. The Statesman Buchanan, in Buchanan Dying, act 1 (1974).