Ogden Nash Quotes

I think that I shall never see A billboard lovely as a tree.
Ogden Nash (1902-1971), U.S. poet. Song of the Open Road (l. 1-2). . . Oxford Book of American Light Verse, The. William Harmon, ed. (1979) Oxford University Press.
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O Adolescence, O Adolescence I wince before thine incandescence . . . When anxious elders swarm about Crying "Where are you going?", thou answerest "Out," . . . Strewn! All is lost and nothing found Lord, how thou leavest things around! . . . Ah well, I must not carp and cavil I'll chew the spinach, spit out the gravel, Remembering how my heart has leapt At times when me thou didst accept Still, I'd like to be present, I must confess, When thine own adolescents adolesce.
Ogden Nash (1902-1971), U.S. poet. "Tarkington, Thou Should'st Be Living in This Hour," Versus, 1949.
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Indoors or out, no one relaxes In March, that month of wind and taxes, The wind will presently disappear, The taxes last us all the year.
Ogden Nash (1902-1971), U.S. poet. "Thar She Blows," Versus (1949).
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If you are really Master of your Fate, It shouldn't make any difference to you whether Cleopatra or the Bearded Lady is your mate.
Ogden Nash (1902-1971), U.S. poet. The Anatomy of Happiness, I'm a Stranger Here Myself (1938).
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The most exciting happiness is the happiness generated by forces beyond your control.
Ogden Nash (1902-1971), U.S. poet. The Anatomy of Happiness, I'm a Stranger Here Myself (1938).
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The cow is of the bovine ilk; One end is moo, the other, milk.
Ogden Nash (1902-1971), U.S. poet. "The Cow," (l. 1), Free Wheeling (1931).
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Better yet, if called by a panther, Don't anther.
Ogden Nash (1902-1971), U.S. poet. The Panther (l. 5-6). . . Oxford Book of American Light Verse, The. William Harmon, ed. (1979) Oxford University Press.
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Children aren't happy with nothing to ignore, And that's what parents were created for.
Ogden Nash (1902-1971), U.S. poet. "The Parent," Happy Days (1933).
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Whether elected or appointed He considers himself the Lord's annointed, And indeed the ointment lingers on him So thick you can't get your fingers on him.
Ogden Nash (1902-1971), U.S. poet. "The Politician," I'm a Stranger Here Myself (1938).
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Camped on a tropic riverside, One day he missed his loving bride. She had, the guide informed him later, Been eaten by an alligator. Professor Twist could not but smile. "You mean," he said, "a crocodile."
Ogden Nash (1902-1971), U.S. poet. The Purist (l. 5-10). . . Oxford Book of Children's Verse in America, The. Donald Hall, ed. (1985) Oxford University Press.
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