Oliver Goldsmith Quotes

Truth from his lips prevailed with double sway, And fools, who came to scoff, remained to pray.
Oliver Goldsmith (1728-1774), Anglo-Irish author, poet, playwright. The Deserted Village, l. 179-180 (1770). Referring to the village preacher.
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Leontine: An only son, sir, might expect more indulgence. Croaker: An only father, sir, might expect more obedience.
Oliver Goldsmith (1728-1774), Anglo-Irish author. The Good Natur'd Man, act 1.
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When any one of our relations was found to be a person of a very bad character, a troublesome guest, or one we desired to get rid of, upon his leaving my house I ever took care to lend him a riding-coat, or a pair of boots, or sometimes a horse of small value, and I always had the satisfaction of finding he never came back to return them.
Oliver Goldsmith (1728-1774), Anglo-Irish author, poet, playwright. The narrator (Dr. Charles Primrose), in The Vicar of Wakefield, ch. 1 (1766).
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The jests of the rich are ever successful.
Oliver Goldsmith (1728-1774), Anglo-Irish author, poet, playwright. the narrator (Dr. Charles Primrose), in The Vicar of Wakefield, ch. 7 (written 1761-1762, publ. 1766).
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We had no revolutions to fear, nor fatigues to undergo; all our adventures were by the fireside, and all our migrations from the blue bed to the brown.
Oliver Goldsmith (1728-1774), Anglo-Irish author, poet, playwright. The narrator (Dr. Charles Primrose), in The Vicar of Wakefield, ch. 1 (1766).
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I ... chose my wife as she did her wedding-gown, not for a fine glossy surface, but such qualities as would wear well.
Oliver Goldsmith (1728-1774), Anglo-Irish author, poet, playwright. The narrator (Dr. Charles Primrose), in The Vicar of Wakefield, ch. 1 (1766).
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Honour sinks where commerce long prevails.
Oliver Goldsmith (1728-1774), Anglo-Irish author, poet, playwright. The Traveller, l. 92 (1764).
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Where the broad ocean leans against the land.
Oliver Goldsmith (1728-1774), Anglo-Irish poet, essayist, playwright. The Traveller, l. 284 (1764).
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Law grinds the poor, and rich men rule the law.
Oliver Goldsmith (1728-1774), Anglo-Irish author, poet, playwright. The Traveller, l. 386 (1764).
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This dog and man at first were friends; But when a pique began, The dog, to gain some private ends, Went mad and bit the man.
Oliver Goldsmith (1730?-1774), Irish playwright, novelist, poet. The Vicar of Wakefield (l. 10-14). . . New Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1950. Helen Gardner, ed. (1972) Oxford University Press.
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