Oliver Goldsmith Quotes

But soon a wonder came to light, That showed the rogues they lied: The man recover'd of the bite, The dog it was that died.
Oliver Goldsmith (1730?-1774), Irish playwright, novelist, poet. The Vicar of Wakefield (l. Fr. Ch. 17). . . New Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1950. Helen Gardner, ed. (1972) Oxford University Press.
(2) (0)
When lovely woman stoops to folly, And finds too late that men betray, What charm can soothe her melancholy, What art can wash her guilt away? The only art her guilt to cover, To hide her shame from every eye, To give repentance to her lover, And wring his bosom—is to die.
Oliver Goldsmith (1730?-1774), Irish playwright, novelist, poet. The Vicar of Wakefield (l. Fr. Ch. 24). . . New Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1950. Helen Gardner, ed. (1972) Oxford University Press.
(3) (0)
As writers become more numerous, it is natural for readers to become more indolent; whence must necessarily arise a desire of attaining knowledge with the greatest possible ease.
Oliver Goldsmith (1728-1774), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. "Upon Unfortunate Merit," The Bee, no. 5 (London, Nov. 3, 1759).
(1) (1)
Could a man live by it, it were not unpleasant employment to be a poet.
Oliver Goldsmith (1728-1774), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Letter, February 1759, to his brother Henry Goldsmith.
(1) (0)
Life at the greatest and best is but a froward child, that must be humoured and coaxed a little till it falls asleep, and then all the care is over.
Oliver Goldsmith (1728-1774), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Croaker, in The Good Natur'd Man, act 1.
(2) (1)