Oscar Wilde Quotes

A thing is not necessarily true because a man dies for it.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. repr. In Complete Works of Oscar Wilde, ed. J.B. Foreman (1966). Erskine, in The Portrait of Mr. W.H., ch. 1, Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine (July 1889).
(4) (0)
The body sins once, and has done with its sin, for action is a mode of purification. Nothing remains then but the recollection of a pleasure, or the luxury of a regret.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 2 (1891).
(2) (0)
One should not be too severe on English novels; they are the only relaxation of the intellectually unemployed.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Pall Mall Gazette (London, Aug. 4, 1886).
(2) (0)
Art is not to be taught in Academies. It is what one looks at, not what one listens to, that makes the artist. The real schools should be the streets.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. "The Relation of Dress to Art: A Note in Black and White on Mr. Whistler's Lecture," Pall Mall Gazette (London, February 28, 1885).
(3) (1)
The great events of life often leave one unmoved; they pass out of consciousness, and, when one thinks of them, become unreal. Even the scarlet flowers of passion seem to grow in the same meadow as the poppies of oblivion.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Erskine, in The Portrait of Mr. W.H., ch. 1, first published in Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine (July 1889).
(4) (0)
Philanthropic people lose all sense of humanity. It is their distinguishing characteristic.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 3 (1891).
(5) (0)
Absolute catholicity of taste is not without its dangers. It is only an auctioneer who should admire all schools of art.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Pall Mall Gazette (London, Feb. 8, 1886).
(2) (0)
All costumes are caricatures. The basis of Art is not the Fancy Ball.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. "The Relation of Dress to Art: A Note in Black and White on Mr. Whistler's Lecture," Pall Mall Gazette (London, February 28, 1885).
(3) (0)
My heart is as some famine-murdered land Whence all good things have perished utterly, And well I know my soul in Hell must lie If I this night before God's throne should stand.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Irish author. E Tenebris (l. 5-8). . . Norton Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. M. H. Abrams, general ed. (5th ed., 1986) W. W. Norton & Company.
(1) (0)
The husbands of very beautiful women belong to the criminal classes.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 15 (1891).
(10) (0)