Oscar Wilde Quotes

Whatever harsh criticisms may be passed on the construction of her sentences, she at least possesses that one touch of vulgarity that makes the whole world kin.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Book review. Pall Mall Gazette (London, Oct. 28, 1886).
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A person who, because he has corns himself, always treads on other people's toes.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. The Roman Candle, in "The Remarkable Rocket," The Happy Prince and Other Tales (1888). Answering the question, "What is a sensitive person?"
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Come down, O Christ, and help me! reach thy hand, For I am drowning in a stormier sea Than Simon on thy lake of Galilee:
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Irish author. E Tenebris (l. 1-3). . . Norton Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. M. H. Abrams, general ed. (5th ed., 1986) W. W. Norton & Company.
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Nothing makes one so vain as being told that one is a sinner.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 8 (1891).
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Only mediocrities progress. An artist revolves in a cycle of masterpieces, the first of which is no less perfect than the last.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Letter to the editor. Pall Mall Gazette (London, September 25, 1894).
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People sometimes inquire what form of government is most suitable for an artist to live under. To this question there is only one answer. The form of government that is most suitable to the artist is no government at all.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. (repr. 1895). "The Soul of Man Under Socialism," Fortnightly Review (London, February 1891).
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All bad poetry springs from genuine feeling. To be natural is to be obvious, and to be obvious is to be inartistic.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Gilbert, in The Critic as Artist, pt. 2, published in Intentions (1891).
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Laughter is not at all a bad beginning for a friendship, and it is far the best ending for one.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 1 (1891).
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He had that curious love of green, which in individuals is always the sign of a subtle artistic temperament, and in nations is said to denote a laxity, if not a decadence of morals.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. "Pen, Pencil and Poison," Fortnightly Review (London, Jan. 1889).
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Cultivated leisure is the aim of man.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. The Soul of Man under Socialism, Fortnightly Review (London, February 1890).
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