Oscar Wilde Quotes

Newspapers ... give us the bald, sordid, disgusting facts of life. They chronicle, with degrading avidity, the sins of the second-rate, and with the conscientiousness of the illiterate give us accurate and prosaic details of the doings of people of absolutely no interest whatsoever.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Gilbert, in The Critic as Artist, pt. 2, Intentions (1891).
(0) (0)
His work was that curious mixture of bad painting and good intentions that always entitles a man to be called a representative British artist.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 19 (1891). Referring to Basil Hallward.
(1) (0)
Religions die when they are proved to be true. Science is the record of dead religions.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. "Phrases and Philosophies for the Use of the Young," Chameleon (London, Dec. 1894).
(3) (0)
There is no necessity to separate the monarch from the mob; all authority is equally bad.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. (repr. 1895). The Soul of Man Under Socialism, Fortnightly Review (London, Feb. 1891).
(1) (0)
If they have not opened the eyes of the blind, they have at least given great encouragement to the short-sighted, and while their leaders may have all the inexperience of old age, their young men are far too wise to be ever sensible.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Gilbert, in The Critic as Artist, pt. 2, published in Intentions (1891). Speaking of the Impressionists. "Yet," he added, "they will insist on treating painting as if it were a mode of autobiography invented for the use of the illiterate."
(1) (0)
There is only one thing in the world worse than being talked about, and that is not being talked about.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 1 (1891).
(4) (0)
Dullness is the coming of age of seriousness.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. "Phrases and Philosophies for the Use of the Young," Chameleon (London, Dec. 1894).
(1) (0)
If property had simply pleasures, we could stand it; but its duties make it unbearable. In the interest of the rich we must get rid of it.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. (repr. 1895). The Soul of Man Under Socialism, The Fortnightly Review (London, February 1891).
(1) (0)
Man is least himself when he talks in his own person. Give him a mask, and he will tell you the truth.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Gilbert, in The Critic as Artist, pt. 2, published in Intentions (1891).
(5) (0)
There is no such thing as an omen. Destiny does not send us heralds. She is too wise or too cruel for that.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 17 (1891).
(2) (0)