Oscar Wilde Quotes

Time is waste of money.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. "Phrases and Philosophies for the Use of the Young," Chameleon (London, Dec. 1894).
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The fact is, the public make use of the classics of a country as a means of checking the progress of Art. They degrade the classics into authorities. They use them as bludgeons for preventing the free expression of Beauty in new forms.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. (repr. 1895). The Soul of Man Under Socialism, Fortnightly Review (London, Feb. 1891).
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Public Opinion ... an attempt to organise the ignorance of the community, and to elevate it to the dignity of physical force.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Gilbert, in The Critic as Artist, pt. 2, published in Intentions (1891).
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I can stand brute force, but brute reason is quite unbearable. There is something unfair about its use. It is hitting below the intellect.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 3 (1891).
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There is something tragic about the enormous number of young men there are in England at the present moment who start life with perfect profiles, and end by adopting some useful profession.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Phrases and Philosophies for the Use of the Young, Chameleon (London, December 1894).
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The only thing that one really knows about human nature is that it changes. Change is the one quality we can predicate of it. The systems that fail are those that rely on the permanency of human nature, and not on its growth and development. The error of Louis XIV was that he thought human nature would always be the same. The result of his error was the French Revolution. It was an admirable result.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. The Soul of Man Under Socialism, Fortnightly Review (London, February 1891, repr. 1895).
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Conversation should touch everything, but should concentrate itself on nothing.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Gilbert, in The Critic as Artist, pt. 2, published in Intentions (1891).
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It often happens that the real tragedies of life occur in such an inartistic manner that they hurt us by their crude violence, their absolute incoherence, their absurd want of meaning, their entire lack of style.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 8 (1891).
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The old believe everything; the middle-aged suspect everything; the young know everything.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Chameleon (London, Dec. 1894). Phrases and Philosophies for the Use of the Young, repr. In Complete Works of Oscar Wilde, ed. J.B. Foreman (1966).
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The fact is, that civilisation requires slaves.... Human slavery is wrong, insecure, and demoralising. On mechanical slavery, on the slavery of the machine, the future of the world depends.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. (repr. 1895). "The Soul of Man Under Socialism," Fortnightly Review (London, Feb. 1891).
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