Oscar Wilde Quotes

Memory ... is the diary that we all carry about with us.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Miss Prism, in The Importance of Being Earnest, act 2.
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Every great man nowadays has his disciples, and it is usually Judas who writes the biography.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. repr. In Complete Works of Oscar Wilde, ed. J.B. Foreman (1966). The Butterfly's Boswell, Court and Society Review (London, April 20, 1887). also in The Critic as Artist, pt. 1, in Intentions (1891).
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Every portrait that is painted with feeling is a portrait of the artist, not of the sitter.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Basil Hallward, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 1 (1891).
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I can resist everything except temptation.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Darlington, in Lady Windermere's Fan, act 1 (1893). This was a favorite theme of Wilde's. In An Ideal Husband, act 2 (performed 1895, published 1899), Sir Robert Chiltern says to Lord Goring, "Do you really think, Arthur, that it is weakness that yields to temptation? I tell you that there are terrible temptations that it requires strength, strength and courage, to yield to." Again, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 2 (1891), Wilde wrote: "The only way to get rid of a temptation is to yield to it."
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The fact is, you have fallen lately, Cecily, into a bad habit of thinking for yourself. You should give it up. It is not quite womanly.... Men don't like it.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Miss Prism, in The Importance of Being Earnest, act 3.
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We have really everything in common with America nowadays, except, of course, language.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. repr. In Complete Works of Oscar Wilde, ed. J.B. Foreman (1966). The Canterville Ghost, ch. 1, Court and Society Review (London, Feb. 23 and March 2, 1887). The words, or similar ones, have often been attributed to George Bernard Shaw, though they are not to be found in Shaw's published writings. Bertrand Russell made a similar point in Saturday Evening Post, June 3, 1944: "It is a misfortune for Anglo- American friendship that the two countries are supposed to have a common language."
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To many, no doubt, he will seem to be somewhat blatant and bumptious, but we prefer to regard him as being simply British.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. book review, Pall Mall Gazette (London, Nov. 18, 1886).
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We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Darlington, in Lady Windermere's Fan, act 3 (1893).
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Must we really see Chicago in order to be educated?
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Mr. Erskine, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 3 (1891).
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He must have a truly romantic nature, for he weeps when there is nothing at all to weep about.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. The Catherine Wheel, in "The Remarkable Rocket," The Happy Prince and Other Tales (1888).
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