Oscar Wilde Quotes

A man's face is his autobiography. A woman's face is her work of fiction.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Quoted in H. Montgomery Hyde, Oscar Wilde, ch. 9 (1976).
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Through our sunless lanes creeps Poverty with her hungry eyes, and Sin with his sodden face follows close behind her. Misery wakes us in the morning and Shame sits with us at night.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. The weaver, in "The Young King," A House of Pomegranates (1891).
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As long as war is regarded as wicked, it will always have its fascination. When it is looked upon as vulgar, it will cease to be popular.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Gilbert, in The Critic as Artist, pt. 2, Intentions (1891).
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It is perfectly monstrous the way people go about nowadays saying things against one behind one's back that are absolutely and entirely true.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 15 (1891). The words reappeared in A Woman of No Importance, act 1.
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Frank Harris has been received in all the great houses—once!
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Quoted in John F. Gallagher's introduction to Harris, My Life and Loves (1963 ed.).
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How strange a thing this is! The Priest telleth me that the Soul is worth all the gold in the world, and the merchants say that it is not worth a clipped piece of silver.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. The young fisherman, in "The Fisherman and his Soul," A House of Pomegranates (1891).
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Anybody can write a three-volume novel. It merely requires a complete ignorance of both life and literature.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Gilbert, in The Critic as Artist, pt. 1, published in Intentions (1891).
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There are only two kinds of people who are really fascinating—people who know absolutely everything, and people who know absolutely nothing.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 7 (1891).
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I put all my genius into my life; I put only my talent into my works.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Journal entry, June 29, 1913. Quoted in Journals 1889-1949, André Gide (1951). Also quoted in Gide's Oscar Wilde "In Memoriam" (1910).
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The crude commercialism of America, its materialising spirit, its indifference to the poetical side of things, and its lack of imagination and of high unattainable ideals, are entirely due to that country having adopted for its national hero a man who, according to his own confession, was incapable of telling a lie, and it is not too much to say that the story of George Washington and the cherry-tree has done more harm, and in a shorter space of time, than any other moral tale in the whole of literature.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Vivian, in "The Decay of Lying," Intentions (1891).
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