Oscar Wilde Quotes

Yes, I am a thorough republican. No other form of government is so favorable to the growth of art.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. remark, Feb. 21, 1882, Louisville, Ky. Quoted in Richard Ellman, Oscar Wilde, ch. 7 (1987).
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It is always the unreadable that occurs.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Vivian, in "The Decay of Lying," Intentions (1891).
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The man who sees both sides of a question is a man who sees absolutely nothing at all.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Gilbert, in The Critic as Artist, pt. 2, published in Intentions (1891).
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Murder is always a mistake. One should never do anything that one cannot talk about after dinner.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 19 (1891).
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We Irish are too poetical to be poets; we are a nation of brilliant failures, but we are the greatest talkers since the Greeks.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Quoted in Richard Ellman, Oscar Wilde, ch. 11 (1987). Said, Christmas 1888, to poet W.B. Yeats.
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The more one analyses people, the more all reasons for analysis disappear. Sooner or later one comes to that dreadful universal thing called human nature.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Vivian, in "The Decay of Lying," Intentions (1891).
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Formerly we used to canonise our heroes. The modern method is to vulgarise them. Cheap editions of great books may be delightful, but cheap editions of great men are absolutely detestable.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Gilbert, in The Critic as Artist, pt. 1, Intentions (1891).
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The advantage of the emotions is that they lead us astray.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 3 (1891).
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When liberty comes with hands dabbled in blood it is hard to shake hands with her.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Comment to reporters on the murder in Dublin of the new Irish chief secretary, Lord Frederick Cavendish, by Fenian nationalists, May 1882. Quoted in Richard Ellman, Oscar Wilde, ch. 7 (1987).
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Thinking is the most unhealthy thing in the world, and people die of it just as they die of any other disease. Fortunately, in England at any rate, thought is not catching. Our splendid physique as a people is entirely due to our national stupidity.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Vivian, in The Decay of Lying, published in Intentions (1891).
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