Oscar Wilde Quotes

I seem to have heard that observation before.... It has all the vitality of error and all the tediousness of an old friend.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Gilbert, in The Critic as Artist, pt. 1, published in Intentions (1891).
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When one is in love, one always begins by deceiving one's self, and one always ends by deceiving others. That is what the world calls a romance.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 4 (1891). The same words were spoken by Lord Illingworth in A Woman of No Importance, act 3.
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Twenty years of romance makes a woman look like a ruin; but twenty years of marriage makes her look like a public building.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. From A Woman of No Importance (1893). Quoted in The Epigrams of Oscar Wilde, ed. Alvin Redman (1952).
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Most of our modern portrait painters are doomed to absolute oblivion. They never paint what they see. They paint what the public sees, and the public never sees anything.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Vivian, in The Decay of Lying, published in Intentions (1891).
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To give an accurate description of what has never occurred is not merely the proper occupation of the historian, but the inalienable privilege of any man of parts and culture.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Gilbert, in The Critic as Artist, pt. 1, published in Intentions (1891).
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There are many things that we would throw away if we were not afraid that others might pick them up.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 4 (1891).
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Tread lightly, she is near Under the snow, Speak gently, she can hear The daisies grow.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Irish author. Requiescat (l. 1-4). . . Oxford Book of Nineteenth-Century English Verse, The. John Hayward, ed. (1964; reprinted, with corrections, 1965) Oxford University Press.
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His style is chaos illumined by flashes of lightning. As a writer he has mastered everything except language.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Vivian, in "The Decay of Lying," Intentions (1891). Of author George Meredith.
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It is because Humanity has never known where it was going that it has been able to find its way.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Gilbert, in The Critic as Artist, pt. 1, Intentions (1891).
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One should never make one's debut with a scandal. One should reserve that to give an interest to one's old age.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 8 (1891).
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