Oscar Wilde Quotes

Few parents nowadays pay any regard to what their children say to them. The old-fashioned respect for the young is fast dying out.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Gwendolen, in The Importance of Being Earnest, act 1.
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Death and vulgarity are the only two facts in the nineteenth century that one cannot explain away.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 19 (1891).
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The true critic is he who bears within himself the dreams and ideas and feelings of myriad generations, and to whom no form of thought is alien, no emotional impulse obscure.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Review of Walter Pater, Appreciations, with an Essay on Style, published in Speaker (March 22, 1890).
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Everybody who is incapable of learning has taken to teaching.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Vivian, in "The Decay of Lying," published in Intentions (1891).
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On an occasion of this kind it becomes more than a moral duty to speak one's mind. It becomes a pleasure.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Gwendolen, in The Importance of Being Earnest, act 3.
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She lacks the indefinable charm of weakness.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 15 (1891). Said of the Duchess of Monmouth.
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He to whom the present is the only thing that is present, knows nothing of the age in which he lives.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Review of Walter Pater, Appreciations, with an Essay on Style, Speaker (London, March 22, 1890).
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In fact, the whole of Japan is a pure invention. There is no such country, there are no such people.... The Japanese people are ... simply a mode of style, an exquisite fancy of art.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Vivian, in "The Decay of Lying," Intentions (1891).
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If you are not too long, I will wait here for you all my life.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Gwendolen, in The Importance of Being Earnest, act 4.
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The value of an idea has nothing whatsoever to do with the sincerity of the man who expresses it. Indeed, the probabilities are that the more insincere the man is, the more purely intellectual will the idea be, as in that case it will not be coloured by either his wants, his desires, or his prejudices.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Henry, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 1 (1891).
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