Oscar Wilde Quotes

Those whom the gods love grow young.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. A Few Maxims for the Instruction of the Over-Educated, Saturday Review (London, Nov. 17, 1894).
One's past is what one is. It is the only way by which people should be judged.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lady Chiltern, in An Ideal Husband, act 1.
The worst form of tyranny the world has ever known ... the tyranny of the weak over the strong. It is the only tyranny that lasts.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Illingworth, in A Woman of No Importance, act 3. Referring to the "tyranny" of women.
The truth is rarely pure and never simple. Modern life would be very tedious if it were either, and modern literature a complete impossibility!
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Algernon, in The Importance of Being Earnest, act 1.
Nowadays, all the married men live like bachelors, and all the bachelors like married men.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lady Hunstanton, in A Woman of No Importance, act 2. The aphorism also appeared in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 15 (1891).
Every woman is a rebel, and usually in wild revolt against herself.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Illingworth, in A Woman of No Importance, act 3.
It is very vulgar to talk about one's business. Only people like stockbrokers do that, and then merely at dinner parties.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Algernon, in The Importance of Being Earnest, act 3.
How clever you are, my dear! You never mean a single word you say.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lady Hunstanton to Mrs. Allonby, in A Woman of No Importance, act 2.
Discontent is the first step in the progress of a man or a nation.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Illingworth, in A Woman of No Importance, act 2.
The amount of women in London who flirt with their own husbands is perfectly scandalous. It looks so bad. It is simply washing one's clean linen in public.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Algernon, in The Importance of Being Earnest, act 1.