Oscar Wilde Quotes

To lose one parent may be regarded as a misfortune ... to lose both seems like carelessness.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lady Bracknell, in The Importance of Being Earnest, act 1.
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The only difference between the saint and the sinner is that every saint has a past, and every sinner has a future.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Illingworth, in A Woman of No Importance, act 3.
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The American father ... is never seen in London. He passes his life entirely in Wall Street and communicates with his family once a month by means of a telegram in cipher.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. "The American Invasion," Court and Society Review (London, March 23, 1887).
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The critic has to educate the public; the artist has to educate the critic.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. letter, Aug. 16, 1890, to the editor of the Scots Observer. In answer to criticisms leveled at Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray.
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Never speak disrespectfully of Society, Algernon. Only people who can't get into it do that.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lady Bracknell, in The Importance of Being Earnest, act 4 (1895).
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A man who can dominate a London dinner table can dominate the world. The future belongs to the dandy. It is the exquisites who are going to rule.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Illingworth, in A Woman of No Importance, act 3.
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Though one can dine in New York, one could not dwell there.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. "The American Invasion," Court and Society Review (London, March 1887).
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There is no such thing as morality or immorality in thought. There is immoral emotion.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. (Wilde) v. Queensberry (April 3, 1895). In answer to Edward Carson, Q.C., during Wilde's prosecution of the Marquess of Queensberry for criminal libel, in Regina- ...
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Thirty-five is a very attractive age. London society is full of women of the highest birth who have, of their own free choice, remained thirty-five for years.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lady Bracknell, in The Importance of Being Earnest, act 4 (1895).
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Talk to every woman as if you loved her, and to every man as if he bored you, and at the end of your first season you will have the reputation of possessing the most perfect social tact.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Illingworth, in A Woman of No Importance, act 3.
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