Oscar Wilde Quotes

The Bostonians take their learning too sadly: culture with them is an accomplishment rather than an atmosphere; their "Hub," as they call it, is the paradise of prigs.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. "The American Invasion," Court and Society Review (London, March 1887).
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While one should always study the method of a great artist, one should never imitate his manner. The manner of an artist is essentially individual, the method of an artist is absolutely universal. The first is personality, which no one should copy; the second is perfection, which all should aim at.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Dramatic Review (London, Feb. 20, 1886).
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No woman should ever be quite accurate about her age. It looks so calculating.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lady Bracknell, in The Importance of Being Earnest, act 4 (1895).
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Moderation is a fatal thing.... Nothing succeeds like excess.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. (1893). Lord Illingworth, in A Woman of No Importance, act 3.
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Political life at Washington is like political life in a suburban vestry.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. "The American Invasion," Court and Society Review (March 1887).
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If a man needs an elaborate tombstone in order to remain in the memory of his country, it is clear that his living at all was an act of absolute superfluity.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. public letter, read Jan. 15, 1885, at Funeral and Mourning Reform meeting, Leicester, England.
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I dislike arguments of any kind. They are always vulgar, and often convincing.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lady Bracknell, in The Importance of Being Earnest, act 4 (1895). Wilde also wrote, "Arguments are extremely vulgar, for everybody in good society holds exactly the same opinions."M"The Remarkable Rocket," published in The Happy Prince and Other Tales (1888).
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Youth! There is nothing like youth. The middle-aged are mortgaged to Life. The old are in Life's lumber-room. But youth is the Lord of Life. Youth has a kingdom waiting for it. Every one is born a king, and most people die in exile.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Illingworth, in A Woman of No Importance, act 3.
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The cities of America are inexpressibly tedious. The Bostonians take their learning too sadly; culture with them is an accomplishment rather than an atmosphere; their "Hub," as they call it, is the paradise of prigs. Chicago is a sort of monster-shop, full of bustles and bores. Political life at Washington is like political life in a suburban vestry. Baltimore is amusing for a week, but Philadelphia is dreadfully provincial; and though one can dine in New York one could not dwell there.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. repr. In Aristotle at Afternoon Tea: The Rare Oscar Wilde (1991). "The American Invasion," Court and Society Review (London, March 23, 1887).
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The Americans are certainly hero-worshippers, and always take their heroes from the criminal classes.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Letter, April 19, 1882.
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