Oscar Wilde Quotes

Pardon me, you are not engaged to any one. When you do become engaged to some one, I, or your father, should his health permit him, will inform you of the fact. An engagement should come on a young girl as a surprise, pleasant or unpleasant, as the case may be. It is hardly a matter that she could be allowed to arrange for herself.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lady Bracknell to Gwendolyn, in The Importance of Being Earnest, act 1.
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Children begin by loving their parents. After a time they judge them. Rarely, if ever, do they forgive them.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Illingworth, in A Woman of No Importance, act 2 (1891). Wilde had used almost the same words in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 5 (1891).
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In America the young are always ready to give to those who are older than themselves the full benefits of their inexperience.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. repr. In Aristotle at Afternoon Tea: The Rare Oscar Wilde (1991). "The American Invasion," Court and Society Review (London, March 23, 1887).
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Mr. Edward Carson, QC: Do you drink champagne yourself? Mr. Oscar Wilde: Yes; iced champagne is a favourite drink of mine—strongly against my doctor's orders. Mr. Edward Carson, QC: Never mind your doctor's orders, sir! Mr. Oscar Wilde: I never do.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Exchange, April 4, 1895, during Wilde's prosecution of the Marquess of Queensberry for criminal libel, Regina (Wilde) v. Queensberry.
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After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lady Caroline, in A Woman of No Importance, act 2.
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The intellect is not a serious thing, and never has been. It is an instrument on which one plays, that is all.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Illingworth, in A Woman of No Importance, act 1.
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On the whole, the great success of marriage in the States is due partly to the fact that no American man is ever idle, and partly to the fact that no American wife is considered responsible for the quality of her husband's dinners.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. "The American Man," Court and Society Review (London, April 13, 1887). In the same article, Wilde called marriage one of America's most popular institutions: "The American man marries early, and the American woman marries often; and they get on extremely well together."
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Those whom the gods love grow young.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. A Few Maxims for the Instruction of the Over-Educated, Saturday Review (London, Nov. 17, 1894).
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One's past is what one is. It is the only way by which people should be judged.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lady Chiltern, in An Ideal Husband, act 1.
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The worst form of tyranny the world has ever known ... the tyranny of the weak over the strong. It is the only tyranny that lasts.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Illingworth, in A Woman of No Importance, act 3. Referring to the "tyranny" of women.
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