Oscar Wilde Quotes

And the wild regrets, and the bloody sweats, None knew so well as I: For he who lives more lives than one More deaths than one must die.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. repr. In Complete Works of Oscar Wilde, ed. J.B. Foreman (1966). The Ballad of Reading Gaol, pt. 3, st. 37 (1898). In 1895, Wilde was tried twice for "indecent acts" and sentenced to two years' hard labor in Reading Gaol. Almost universally ostracised on his release, he spent the remaining three years of his life under an assumed name in voluntary exile in Europe.
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The truth is rarely pure and never simple. Modern life would be very tedious if it were either, and modern literature a complete impossibility!
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Algernon, in The Importance of Being Earnest, act 1.
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Nowadays, all the married men live like bachelors, and all the bachelors like married men.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lady Hunstanton, in A Woman of No Importance, act 2. The aphorism also appeared in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 15 (1891).
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Every woman is a rebel, and usually in wild revolt against herself.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Illingworth, in A Woman of No Importance, act 3.
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It is sweet to dance to violins When Love and Life are fair: To dance to flutes, to dance to lutes Is delicate and rare: But it is not sweet with nimble feet To dance upon the air!
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. repr. In Complete Works of Oscar Wilde, ed. J.B. Foreman (1966). The Ballad of Reading Gaol, pt. 2, st. 9 (1898).
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It is very vulgar to talk about one's business. Only people like stockbrokers do that, and then merely at dinner parties.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Algernon, in The Importance of Being Earnest, act 3.
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How clever you are, my dear! You never mean a single word you say.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lady Hunstanton to Mrs. Allonby, in A Woman of No Importance, act 2.
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Discontent is the first step in the progress of a man or a nation.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Illingworth, in A Woman of No Importance, act 2.
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For his mourners will be outcast men, And outcasts always mourn.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. The Ballad of Reading Gaol, sct. 4. Inscribed on Wilde's tomb.
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The amount of women in London who flirt with their own husbands is perfectly scandalous. It looks so bad. It is simply washing one's clean linen in public.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Algernon, in The Importance of Being Earnest, act 1.
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