Oscar Wilde Quotes

There is nothing so difficult to marry as a large nose.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lady Markby, in An Ideal Husband, act 1.
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One knows so well the popular idea of health. The English country gentleman galloping after a fox—the unspeakable in full pursuit of the uneatable.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Illingworth, in A Woman of No Importance, act 1 (1893).
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Yet each man kills the thing he loves, By each let this be heard, Some do it with a bitter look, Some with a flattering word. The coward does it with a kiss, The brave man with a sword!
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. repr. In Complete Works of Oscar Wilde, ed. J.B. Foreman (1966). The Ballad of Reading Gaol, pt. 1, st. 7 (1898). The lines are often interpreted as referring to Lord Alfred Douglas, with whom Wilde had a liaison which led to Wilde's trial and imprisonment for homosexual offenses. Wilde reproached Douglas for the latter's behavior towards him during and after the trial.
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Relations are simply a tedious pack of people, who haven't got the remotest knowledge of how to live, nor the smallest instinct about when to die.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Algernon, in The Importance of Being Earnest, act 1 (1895).
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I'm sure I don't know half the people who come to my house. Indeed, from all I hear, I shouldn't like to.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lady Markby, in An Ideal Husband, act 2.
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Nothing spoils a romance so much as a sense of humour in the woman.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Illingworth, in A Woman of No Importance, act 1.
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Like two doomed ships that pass in storm We had crossed each other's way: But we made no sign, we said no word, We had no word to say;
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Irish author. The Ballad of Reading Gaol (l. 163-166). . . Oxford Book of Narrative Verse, The. Iona Opie and Peter Opie, eds. (1983) Oxford University Press.
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Really, if the lower orders don't set us a good example, what on earth is the use of them? They seem, as a class, to have absolutely no sense of moral responsibility.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Algernon, in The Importance of Being Earnest, act 1 (1895).
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Don't tell me that you have exhausted Life. When a man says that, one knows that life has exhausted him.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lady Narborough, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 15 (1891).
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Women love us for our defects. If we have enough of them, they will forgive us everything, even our gigantic intellects.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Illingworth, in A Woman of No Importance, act 3 (1893). The remark had also appeared, two years earlier, in The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. 15 (1891).
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