Oscar Wilde Quotes

The vilest deeds like poison weeds, Bloom well in prison-air; It is only what is good in Man That wastes and withers there: Pale Anguish keeps the heavy gate, And the Warder is Despair.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Irish author. The Ballad of Reading Gaol (l. 559-564). . . Oxford Book of Narrative Verse, The. Iona Opie and Peter Opie, eds. (1983) Oxford University Press.
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The liar at any rate recognizes that recreation, not instruction, is the aim of conversation, and is a far more civilised being than the blockhead who loudly expresses his disbelief in a story which is told simply for the amusement of the company.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. repr. In Aristotle at Afternoon Tea: The Rare Oscar Wilde (1991). "Aristotle at Afternoon Tea," Pall Mall Gazette (London, February 28, 1885).
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It is he who has broken the bond of marriage—not I. I only break its bondage.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lady Windermere, in Lady Windermere's Fan, act 2.
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You should study the Peerage, Gerald. It is the one book a young man about town should know thoroughly, and it is the best thing in fiction the English have ever done.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Illingworth, in A Woman of No Importance, act 3.
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I walked, with other souls in pain,
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Irish author. The Ballad of Reading Gaol (l. 19). . . Oxford Book of Narrative Verse, The. Iona Opie and Peter Opie, eds. (1983) Oxford University Press.
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Popularity is the crown of laurel which the world puts on bad art. Whatever is popular is wrong.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lecture, June 30, 1883, to students of the Royal Academy, London. Aristotle at Afternoon Tea: The Rare Oscar Wilde (1991).
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London is full of women who trust their husbands. One can always recognise them. They look so thoroughly unhappy.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lady Windermere, in Lady Windermere's Fan, act 2.
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Musical people are so absurdly unreasonable. They always want one to be perfectly dumb at the very moment when one is longing to be absolutely deaf.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Mabel Chiltern, in An Ideal Husband, act 2.
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But neither milk-white rose nor red May bloom in prison air; The shard, the pebble, and the flint, Are what they give us there: For flowers have been known to heal A common man's despair.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Irish author. The Ballad of Reading Gaol (l. 487-492). . . Oxford Book of Narrative Verse, The. Iona Opie and Peter Opie, eds. (1983) Oxford University Press.
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There should be a law that no ordinary newspaper should be allowed to write about art. The harm they do by their foolish and random writing it would be impossible to overestimate—not to the artist but to the public.... Without them we would judge a man simply by his work; but at present the newspapers are trying hard to induce the public to judge a sculptor, for instance, never by his statues but by the way he treats his wife; a painter by the amount of his income and a poet by the colour of his necktie.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. "Art and the Handicraftsman," Aristotle at Afternoon Tea: The Rare Oscar Wilde (1991). Manuscript written 1882 in Philadelphia for a lecture.
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