Oscar Wilde Quotes

A sentimentalist, my dear Darlington, is a man who sees an absurd value in everything, and doesn't know the market price of any single thing.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Cecil Graham, in Lady Windermere's Fan, act 3.
(6) (1)
To love oneself is the beginning of a life-long romance.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Goring, in An Ideal Husband, act 3. The quip had already appeared in Phrases and Philosophies for the Use of the Young, in Chameleon (London, Dec. 1894).
(15) (0)
I delight in men over seventy. They always offer one the devotion of a lifetime.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Mrs. Allonby, in A Woman of No Importance, act 4.
(4) (0)
I like to do all the talking myself. It saves time, and prevents arguments.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. The frog, in "The Remarkable Rocket," The Happy Prince and Other Tales (1888).
(17) (1)
It is only the superficial qualities that last. Man's deeper nature is soon found out.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Cecily, in The Importance of Being Earnest, act 3, Chameleon (London, Dec. 1894). Also appears in Phrases and Philosophies for the Use of the Young.
(6) (2)
She wore far too much rouge last night and not quite enough clothes. That is always a sign of despair in a woman.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Goring, in An Ideal Husband, act 2.
(10) (1)
A kiss may ruin a human life.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Mrs. Arbuthnot, in A Woman of No Importance, act 4.
(10) (0)
Like strange mechanical grotesques, Making fantastic arabesques, The shadows raced across the blind.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Irish author. The Harlot's House (l. 7-9). . . Norton Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. M. H. Abrams, general ed. (5th ed., 1986) W. W. Norton & Company.
(1) (0)
I know, of course, how important it is not to keep a business engagement, if one wants to retain any sense of the beauty of life.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Cecily, in The Importance of Being Earnest, act 2.
(2) (0)
Vulgarity is simply the conduct of other people.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Goring, in An Ideal Husband, act 3 (1976). Wilde uttered similar words himself in responding to criticisms of his house as "vulgar," when he said, "Vulgarity is the conduct of others." Quoted in H. Montgomery Hyde, Oscar Wilde, ch. 3.
(9) (0)