Oscar Wilde Quotes

The sick do not ask if the hand that smoothes their pillow is pure, nor the dying care if the lips that touch their brow have known the kiss of sin.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Mrs. Arbuthnot, in A Woman of No Importance, act 4.
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All women become like their mothers. That is their tragedy. No man does. That's his.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright and poet. The Importance of Being Earnest, act I (1895).
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The mere mechanical technique of acting can be taught, but the spirit that is to give life to lifeless forms must be born in a man. No dramatic college can teach its pupils to think or to feel. It is Nature who makes our artists for us, though it may be Art who taught them their right mode of expression.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Court and Society Review (London, September 14, 1887).
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I adore political parties. They are the only place left to us where people don't talk politics.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Goring, in An Ideal Husband, act 1.
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Women are never disarmed by compliments. Men always are. That is the difference between the two sexes.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Mrs. Cheveley, in An Ideal Husband, act 3.
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Mr. Whistler always spelt art, and we believe still spells it, with a capital "I."
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. repr. In Aristotle at Afternoon Tea: The Rare Oscar Wilde (1991). "The New President," Pall Mall Gazette (London, January 26, 1889).
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A man's very highest moment is, I have no doubt at all, when he kneels in the dust, and beats his breast, and tells all the sins of his life.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. De Profundis (1905). A letter to Lord Alfred Douglas following Wilde's trial and imprisonment, written in prison.
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I always pass on good advice. It is the only thing to do with it. It is never of any use to oneself.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Goring, in An Ideal Husband, act 1.
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Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Mrs. Cheveley, in An Ideal Husband, act 1.
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No artist has ethical sympathies. An ethical sympathy in an artist is an unpardonable mannerism of style.
Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. The Picture of Dorian Gray, preface (1891).
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