Percy Bysshe Shelley Quotes

Hail to thee, blithe Spirit! Bird thou never wert, That from Heaven, or near it, Pourest thy full heart In profuse strains of unpremeditated art.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. To a Skylark, st. 1 (written 1820). Opening lines.
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Government is an evil; it is only the thoughtlessness and vices of men that make it a necessary evil. When all men are good and wise, government will of itself decay.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. An Address to the Irish People (1812). These sentiments reflect those expressed in Thomas Paine's Common Sense (1776).
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The whispering waves were half asleep, The clouds were gone to play, And on the bosom of the deep The smile of Heaven lay;
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. To Jane: The Recollection (l. 13-16). . . The Complete Poems of Percy Bysshe Shelley. Mary Shelley, ed. (1994) The Modern Library/Random House.
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Love is free; to promise for ever to love the same woman is not less absurd than to promise to believe the same creed; such a vow in both cases excludes us from all inquiry.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. A note from Queen Mab, Even Love Is Sold (1813).
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Thy sweet child Sleep, the filmy-eyed, Murmured like a noontide bee, Shall I nestle near thy side? Wouldst thou me?—And I replied, No, not thee!
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. To Night (l. 24-28). . . The Complete Poems of Percy Bysshe Shelley. Mary Shelley, ed. (1994) The Modern Library/Random House.
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The odious and disgusting aristocracy of wealth is built upon the ruins of all that is good in chivalry or republicanism; and luxury is the forerunner of a barbarism scarcely capable of cure.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. A note, in Queen Mab, A Vindication of Natural Diet (1813).
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In honored poverty thy voice did weave Songs consecrate to truth and liberty;— Deserting these, thou leavest me to grieve, Thus having been, that thou shouldst cease to be.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. To Wordsworth (l. 11-14). . . The Complete Poems of Percy Bysshe Shelley. Mary Shelley, ed. (1994) The Modern Library/Random House.
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To be Omnipotent but friendless is to reign.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. Asia, in Prometheus Unbound, act 2, sc. 4, l. 47-8 (1820).
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When the lamp is shattered, The light in the dust lies dead; When the cloud is scattered, The rainbow's glory is shed; When the lute is broken, Sweet tones are remembered not; When the lips have spoken, Loved accents are soon forgot.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. When the Lamp Is Shattered (l. 1-8). . . The Complete Poems of Percy Bysshe Shelley. Mary Shelley, ed. (1994) The Modern Library/Random House.
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It is impossible that had Buonaparte descended from a race of vegetable feeders that he could have had either the inclination or the power to ascend the throne of the Bourbons.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. A Vindication of Natural Diet, a note in Queen Mab (1813). Shelley became a vegetarian in 1812, remaining so until his death.
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