Percy Bysshe Shelley Quotes

When hearts have one mingled, Love first leaves the well-built nest; The weak one is singled To endure what it once possessed. O Love! who bewailest The frailty of all things here, Why choose you the frailest, For your cradle, your home, and your bier.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. When the Lamp Is Shattered (l. 17-24). . . The Complete Poems of Percy Bysshe Shelley. Mary Shelley, ed. (1994) The Modern Library/Random House.
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. . . A widow bird sat mourning for her love Upon a wintry bough; The frozen wind crept on above, The freezing stream below.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. Charles the First (l. 1-4). . . Oxford Book of Short Poems, The. P. J. Kavanagh and James Michie, eds. Oxford University Press.
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and so this tree— Oh, that such our death may be!— Died in sleep, and felt no pain, To live in happier form again: From which, beneath Heaven's fairest star, The artist wrought this loved guitar;
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. With a Guitar, to Jane (l. 53-58). . . The Complete Poems of Percy Bysshe Shelley. Mary Shelley, ed. (1994) The Modern Library/Random House.
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January gray is here, Like a sexton by her grave; February bears the bier, March with grief doth howl and rave, And April weeps—but, O ye hours! Follow with May's fairest flowers.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. "Dirge for the Year."
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An old, mad, blind, despised, and dying king,
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. England in 1819 (l. 1). . . Norton Anthology of Poetry, The. Alexander W. Allison and others, eds. (3d ed., 1983) W. W. Norton & Company.
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If we reason, we would be understood; if we imagine, we would that the airy children of our brain were born anew within another's; if we feel, we would that another's nerves should vibrate to our own, that the beams of their eyes should kindle at once and mix and melt into our own, that lips of motionless ice should not reply to lips quivering and burning with the heart's best blood. This is Love.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. "Essay on Love," (1815-1819).
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Constancy has nothing virtuous in itself, independently of the pleasure it confers, and partakes of the temporizing spirit of vice in proportion as it endures tamely moral defects of magnitude in the object of its indiscreet choice.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. Even Love Is Sold (1813). A note from Queen Mab.
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Chastity is a monkish and evangelical superstition, a greater foe to natural temperance even than unintellectual sensuality.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. Even Love is Sold, note, Queen Mab (1813).
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The dust of creeds outworn.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. First Spirit, in Prometheus Unbound, act 1, l. 697 (1820).
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And this is Hell—and in this smother, All are damnable and damned; Each one damning, damns the other; They are damned by one another. By none other are they damned.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. "Hell," pt. 3, st. 15, Peter Bell the Third.
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