Percy Bysshe Shelley Quotes

Hell is a city much like London— A populous and a smoky city; There are all sorts of people undone, And there is little or no fun done; Small justice shown, and still less pity.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. "Hell," pt. 3, st. 1, Peter Bell the Third.
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I pursued a maiden and clasped a reed. Gods and men, we are all deluded thus!
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. Hymn of Pan (l. 31-32). . . The Complete Poems of Percy Bysshe Shelley. Mary Shelley, ed. (1994) The Modern Library/Random House.
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There is a harmony In autumn, and a lustre in its sky, Which through the summer is not heard or seen, As if it could not be, as if it had not been!
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. Hymn to Intellectual Beauty (1816).
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Spirit of Beauty, that dost consecrate With thine own hues all thou dost shine upon Of human thought or form,
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. Hymn to Intellectual Beauty (l. 13-15). . . The Complete Poems of Percy Bysshe Shelley. Mary Shelley, ed. (1994) The Modern Library/Random House.
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The awful shadow of some unseen Power Floats though unseen among us, visiting This various world with as inconstant wing As summer winds that creep from flower to flower;
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. Hymn to Intellectual Beauty (l. 1-4). . . The Complete Poems of Percy Bysshe Shelley. Mary Shelley, ed. (1994) The Modern Library/Random House.
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While yet a boy I sought for ghosts, and sped Through many a listening chamber, cave and ruin, And starlight wood, with fearful steps pursuing Hopes of high talk with the departed dead.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. Hymn to Intellectual Beauty (l. 49-52). . . The Complete Poems of Percy Bysshe Shelley. Mary Shelley, ed. (1994) The Modern Library/Random House.
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Thou Paradise of exiles, Italy!
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. Julian and Maddalo, l. 57 (1819).
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It is his weakness to be proud: he derives, from a comparison of his own extraordinary mind with the dwarfish intellects that surround him, an intense apprehension of the nothingness of human life.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. Julian and Maddalo, preface. The description of Count Maddalo was taken to be a portrait of Byron.
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Concerning God, freewill and destiny: Of all that earth has been or yet may be, All that vain men imagine or believe, Or hope can paint or suffering may achieve, We descanted.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. "Julian and Maddalo." In the poem,Shelley re-created a night spent arguing with Byron in Venice, August 23, 1818.
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I love all waste And solitary places; where we taste The pleasure of believing what we see Is boundless, as we wish our souls to be.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. Julian and Maddalo, l. 14-17 (1818).
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