Percy Bysshe Shelley Quotes

Drive my dead thoughts over the universe Like withered leaves to quicken a new birth! And, by the incantation of this verse, Scatter, as from an unextinguished hearth Ashes and sparks, my words among mankind!
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. Ode to the West Wind (l. 63-67). . . The Complete Poems of Percy Bysshe Shelley. Mary Shelley, ed. (1994) The Modern Library/Random House.
(10) (5)
Oh! lift me as a wave, a leaf, a cloud! I fall upon the thorns of life! I bleed!
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. Ode to the West Wind (l. 53-54). . . The Complete Poems of Percy Bysshe Shelley. Mary Shelley, ed. (1994) The Modern Library/Random House.
(21) (8)
The desire of the moth for the star,
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. One word is too often profaned (l. 13). . . The Complete Poems of Percy Bysshe Shelley. Mary Shelley, ed. (1994) The Modern Library/Random House.
(7) (1)
One word is too often profaned For me to profane it, One feeling too falsely disdained For thee to disdain it;
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. One word is too often profaned (l. 1-4). . . The Complete Poems of Percy Bysshe Shelley. Mary Shelley, ed. (1994) The Modern Library/Random House.
(5) (1)
I met a traveller from an antique land Who said: Two vast and trunkless legs of stone Stand in the desert. Near them, on the sand, Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown, And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command, Tell that its sculptor well those passions read Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things, The hand that mocked them, and the heart that fed: And on the pedestal these words appear: "My name is Ozymandias, king of kings: Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!"
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. Ozymandias, l. 1-11 (1819). Written in December 1817, probably in competition with Horace Smith (whose sonnet is extant, but does not name Ozymandias).
(9) (4)
Man who man would be, Must rule the empire of himself; in it Must be supreme, establishing his throne On vanquished will, quelling the anarchy Of hopes and fears, being himself alone.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. "Political Greatness."
(9) (1)
He gave man speech, and speech created thought, Which is the measure of the universe;
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. Prometheus Unbound (Fr. II). . . The Complete Poems of Percy Bysshe Shelley. Mary Shelley, ed. (1994) The Modern Library/Random House.
(9) (2)
The good want power, but to weep barren tears. The powerful goodness want: worse need for them. The wise want love; and those who love want wisdom;
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. Prometheus Unbound (Fr. I). . . The Complete Poems of Percy Bysshe Shelley. Mary Shelley, ed. (1994) The Modern Library/Random House.
(4) (1)
He will watch from dawn to gloom The lake-reflected sun illume The yellow bees in the ivy-bloom, Nor heed nor see, what things they be; But from these create he can Forms more real than living man, Nurslings of immortality!
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. Prometheus Unbound (Fr. I). . . The Complete Poems of Percy Bysshe Shelley. Mary Shelley, ed. (1994) The Modern Library/Random House.
(8) (2)
Death is the veil which those who live call life: They sleep—and it is lifted
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. Prometheus Unbound (Fr. III). . . The Complete Poems of Percy Bysshe Shelley. Mary Shelley, ed. (1994) The Modern Library/Random House.
(6) (2)