Percy Bysshe Shelley Quotes

Child of Light! thy limbs are burning Through the vest which seems to hide them; As the radiant lines of morning Through the clouds ere they divide them; And this atmosphere divinest Shrouds thee wheresoe'er thou shinest.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. Prometheus Unbound (Fr. II). . . The Complete Poems of Percy Bysshe Shelley. Mary Shelley, ed. (1994) The Modern Library/Random House.
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I think that the leaf of a tree, the meanest insect on which we trample, are in themselves arguments more conclusive than any which can be adduced that some vast intellect animates Infinity.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. letter, Jan. 3, 1811.
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To suffer woes which Hope thinks infinite; To forgive wrongs darker than Death or Night; To defy Power, which seems Omnipotent; To love, and bear; to hope, till Hope creates From its own wreck the thing it contemplates; Neither to change nor falter nor repent; This, like thy glory, Titan! is to be Good, great and joyous, beautiful and free; This is alone Life, Joy, Empire and Victory.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. Prometheus Unbound (Fr. IV). . . The Complete Poems of Percy Bysshe Shelley. Mary Shelley, ed. (1994) The Modern Library/Random House.
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It were as wise to cast a violet into a crucible that you might discover the formal principle of its colour and odour, as seek to transfuse from one language into another the creations of a poet. The plant must spring again from its seed, or it will bear no flower—and this is the burthen of the curse of Babel.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. A Defence of Poetry (written 1821, published 1840).
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Fate, Time, Occasion, Chance, and Change? To these All things are subject but eternal Love.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. Prometheus Unbound (Fr. II). . . The Complete Poems of Percy Bysshe Shelley. Mary Shelley, ed. (1994) The Modern Library/Random House.
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Poetry is a sword of lightning, ever unsheathed, which consumes the scabbard that would contain it.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. A Defence of Poetry (written 1821, published 1840).
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My soul is an enchanted Boat
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. Prometheus Unbound (Fr. II). . . The Complete Poems of Percy Bysshe Shelley. Mary Shelley, ed. (1994) The Modern Library/Random House.
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Poetry lifts the veil from the hidden beauty of the world, and makes familiar objects be as if they were not familiar.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. A Defence of Poetry (written 1821, published 1840).
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War is the statesman's game, the priest's delight, The lawyer's jest, the hired assassin's trade.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. Queen Mab, pt. 4, l. 168-9 (1812).
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Poetry is the record of the best and happiest moments of the happiest and best minds.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. A Defence of Poetry (written 1821, published 1840).
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