Percy Bysshe Shelley Quotes

All things are sold: the very light of Heaven Is venal; earth's unsparing gifts of love, The smallest and most despicable things That lurk in the abysses of the deep, All objects of our life, even life itself, And the poor pittance which the laws allow Of liberty, the fellowship of man, Those duties which his heart of human love Should urge him to perform instinctively, Are bought and sold as in a public mart Of undisguising selfishness, that sets On each its price, the stamp-mark of her reign.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. "Queen Mab," pt. 5 (1813).
(5) (3)
The pleasure that is in sorrow is sweeter than the pleasure of pleasure itself.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. A Defence of Poetry (written 1821, published 1840).
(25) (7)
Power, like a desolating pestilence, Pollutes whate'er it touches.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. Queen Mab, pt. 3, l. 176-7 (1813).
(6) (1)
A poet is a nightingale, who sits in darkness and sings to cheer its own solitude with sweet sounds; his auditors are as men entranced by the melody of an unseen musician, who feel that they are moved and softened, yet know not whence or why.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. A Defence of Poetry (written 1821, published 1840).
(22) (9)
Commerce has set the mark of selfishness, The signet of its all-enslaving power, Upon a shining ore, and called it gold: Before whose image bow the vulgar great, The vainly rich, the miserable proud, The mob of peasants, nobles, priests, and kings, And with blind feelings reverence the power That grinds them to the dust of misery.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. Queen Mab, pt. 5 (1813).
(5) (1)
The gigantic shadows which futurity casts upon the present.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. A Defence of Poetry (written 1821, publ. 1840).
(1) (1)
There grew pied wind-flowers and violets, Daisies, those pearl'd Arcturi of the earth, The constellated flower that never sets; Faint oxlips; tender bluebells at whose birth The sod scarce heaved; and that tall flower that wets Its mother's face with heaven-collected tears, When the low wind, its playmate's voice, it hears.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. Question, The (l. 9-15). . . The Complete Poems of Percy Bysshe Shelley. Mary Shelley, ed. (1994) The Modern Library/Random House.
(3) (1)
In a drama of the highest order there is little food for censure or hatred; it teaches rather self-knowledge and self- respect.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. A Defence of Poetry (written 1821, published 1840).
(13) (4)
Rarely, rarely comest thou, Spirit of Delight!
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. Rarely, Rarely, Comest Thou (l. 1-2). . . The Complete Poems of Percy Bysshe Shelley. Mary Shelley, ed. (1994) The Modern Library/Random House.
(5) (2)
Revenge is the naked idol of the worship of a semi-barbarous age.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. A Defence of Poetry (written 1821, publ. 1840).
(13) (8)