Percy Bysshe Shelley Quotes

I love snow, and all the forms Of the radiant frost; I love waves, and winds and storms, Everything almost Which is Nature's, and may be Untainted by man's misery.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. Rarely, Rarely, Comest Thou (l. 31-36). . . The Complete Poems of Percy Bysshe Shelley. Mary Shelley, ed. (1994) The Modern Library/Random House.
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There is this difference between a story and a poem, that a story is a catalogue of detached facts, which have no other connection than time, place, circumstance, cause and effect; the other is the creation of actions according to the unchangeable forms of human nature, as existing in the mind of the creator, which is itself the image of all other minds. The one is partial, and applies only to a definite period of time, and a certain combination of events which can never again recur; the other is universal, and contains within itself the germ of a relation to whatever motives or actions have place in the possible varieties of human nature.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. A Defence of Poetry (1821).
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Bare woods, whose branches strain, Deep caves and dreary main,— Wail, for the world's wrong.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. Rough wind, that moanest loud (l. 6-8). . . The Complete Poems of Percy Bysshe Shelley. Mary Shelley, ed. (1994) The Modern Library/Random House.
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A poet, as he is the author to others of the highest wisdom, pleasure, virtue, and glory, so he ought personally to be the happiest, the best, the wisest, and the most illustrious of men.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. A Defence of Poetry (written 1821, published 1840).
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Two bloodless wolves whose dry throats rattle, Two crows perched on the murrained cattle, Two vipers tangled into one.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. Similes for Two Political Characters of 1819 (l. 18-20). . . The Complete Poems of Percy Bysshe Shelley. Mary Shelley, ed. (1994) The Modern Library/Random House.
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Their errors have been weighed and found to have been dust in the balance; if their sins were as scarlet, they are now white as snow: they have been washed in the blood of the mediator and the redeemer, Time.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. A Defence of Poetry (written 1821, publ. 1840). Referring specifically to the reputations of poets.
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With plough and spade, and hoe and loom, Trace your grave, and build your tomb, And weave your winding-sheet, till fair England be your sepulchre.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. Song to the Men of England (l. 29-32). . . The Complete Poems of Percy Bysshe Shelley. Mary Shelley, ed. (1994) The Modern Library/Random House.
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His very words are instinct with spirit; each is as a spark, a burning atom of inextinguishable thought; and many yet lie covered in the ashes of their birth and pregnant with a lightning which has yet found no conductor.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. A Defence of Poetry (written 1821, published 1840).
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Sow seed—but let no tyrant reap; Find wealth—let no imposter heap; Weave robes—let not the idle wear; Forge arms—in your defence to bear.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. Song to the Men of England (l. 21-24). . . The Complete Poems of Percy Bysshe Shelley. Mary Shelley, ed. (1994) The Modern Library/Random House.
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Tragedy delights by affording a shadow of the pleasure which exists in pain.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. A Defence of Poetry (written 1821, published 1840).
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