Percy Bysshe Shelley Quotes

Men of England, wherefore plough For the lords who lay ye low?
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. Song to the Men of England, st. 1 (written 1819). Opening lines.
(6) (1)
A story of particular facts is a mirror which obscures and distorts that which should be beautiful; poetry is a mirror which makes beautiful that which it distorts.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. A Defence of Poetry (written 1821, published 1840).
(12) (1)
Rulers, who neither see, nor feel, nor know, But leech-like to their fainting country cling, Till they drop, blind in blood, without a blow,— A people starved and stabbed in the untilled field.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. "Sonnet: England in 1819."
(8) (2)
Obscenity, which is ever blasphemy against the divine beauty in life,... is a monster for which the corruption of society forever brings forth new food, which it devours in secret.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. A Defence of Poetry (written 1821, publ. 1840).
(8) (2)
Thy remembrance, and repentance, and deep musings are not free From the music of two voices and the light of one sweet smile.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. Stanzas—April 1814 (l. 29-32). . . The Complete Poems of Percy Bysshe Shelley. Mary Shelley, ed. (1994) The Modern Library/Random House.
(5) (1)
Every epoch, under names more or less specious, has deified its peculiar errors.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. A Defence of Poetry (1840).
(8) (3)
I could lie down like a tired child, And weep away the life of care Which I have borne and yet must bear, Till death like sleep might steal on me,
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. Stanzas Written in Dejection, near Naples (l. 30-33). . . The Complete Poems of Percy Bysshe Shelley. Mary Shelley, ed. (1994) The Modern Library/Random House.
(7) (1)
A man, to be greatly good, must imagine intensely and comprehensively; he must put himself in the place of another and of many others; the pains and pleasures of his species must become his own.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. A Defence of Poetry (written 1821, publ. 1840).
(11) (2)
I silently laugh at my own cenotaph, And out of the caverns of ram, Like a child from the womb, like a ghost from the tomb, I arise and unbuild it again.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. The Cloud (l. 81-84). . . Norton Anthology of Poetry, The. Alexander W. Allison and others, eds. (3d ed., 1983) W. W. Norton & Company.
(6) (1)
The beauty of the internal nature cannot be so far concealed by its accidental vesture, but that the spirit of its form shall communicate itself to the very disguise and indicate the shape it hides from the manner in which it is worn. A majestic form and graceful motions will express themselves through the most barbarous and tasteless costume.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. A Defence of Poetry (written 1821, published 1840).
(5) (1)