Percy Bysshe Shelley Quotes

And like a prophetess of May Strew'd flowers upon the barren way, Making the wintry world appear Like one on whom thou smilest, dear.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. The Invitation (l. 17-20). . . The Complete Poems of Percy Bysshe Shelley. Mary Shelley, ed. (1994) The Modern Library/Random House.
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To that high Capital, where kingly Death Keeps his pale court in beauty and decay, He came.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. Adonais (Fr. VII). . . The Complete Poems of Percy Bysshe Shelley. Mary Shelley, ed. (1994) The Modern Library/Random House.
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Yes, marriage is hateful, detestable. A kind of ineffable, sickening disgust seizes my mind when I think of this most despotic, most unrequited fetter which prejudice has forged to confine its energies.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. Letter, May 2, 1811. The Letters of Percy Bysshe Shelley, vol. 1, ed. Frederick L. Jones (1964). To the same correspondent (Thomas Jefferson Hogg), June 21, 1811, Shelley called matrimony "... the most horrible of all the means which the world has had recourse to bind the noble to itself," but justified his own marriage in a letter to Hogg on Oct. 8 of that year on the grounds that, until considerable improvement of morals had been brought about, it would be advisable to maintain the institution of matrimony.
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Cold hopes swarm like worms within our living clay.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. Adonais, st. 39.
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Here I swear, and as I break my oath may ... eternity blast me, here I swear that never will I forgive Christianity! It is the only point on which I allow myself to encourage revenge.... Oh, how I wish I were the Antichrist, that it were mine to crush the Demon; to hurl him to his native Hell never to rise again—I expect to gratify some of this insatiable feeling in Poetry.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. letter, Jan. 3, 1811. The Letters of Percy Bysshe Shelley, vol. 1, no. 35, ed. Frederick L. Jones (1964).
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I weep for Adonais—he is dead! O, weep for Adonais! though our tears Thaw not the frost which binds so dear a head!
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. Adonais, st. 1 (1821). Opening lines. This elegy written for poet John Keats, died aged 25, is framed in the tradition of Greek poetry, fitting for one whom Shelley regarded as deriving his inspiration from ancient Greece. The name "Adonais" was probably chosen in allusion to the beautiful youth Adonis, killed by a boar while hunting.
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The Galilean is not a favourite of mine. So far from owing him any thanks for his favour, I cannot avoid confessing that I owe a secret grudge to his carpentership.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. Letter, April 24, 1811. The Letters of Percy Bysshe Shelley, vol. 1, ed. Frederick L. Jones (1964).
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He lives, he wakes,—'tis Death is dead, not he;
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. Adonais (Fr. XLI). . . The Complete Poems of Percy Bysshe Shelley. Mary Shelley, ed. (1994) The Modern Library/Random House.
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I met Murder on the way— He had a mask like Castlereagh—
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. The Mask of Anarchy (l. 5-8). . . The Complete Poems of Percy Bysshe Shelley. Mary Shelley, ed. (1994) The Modern Library/Random House.
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Reviewers, with some rare exceptions, are a most stupid and malignant race. As a bankrupt thief turns thief-taker in despair, so an unsuccessful author turns critic.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. Adonais, preface (1821). First draft, later removed.
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