Percy Bysshe Shelley Quotes

I met Murder on the way— He had a mask like Castlereagh.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. The Mask of Anarchy, st. 2 (written 1819, published 1832). In common with other critics of the Tory administration of the day, Shelley despised above all Robert Stewart, Viscount Castlereagh, though there is nothing to suggest that the latter had any specific role in the "Peterloo Massacre" in August 1819, when military forces fired on a Reform meeting in Manchester—an event that stirred Shelley to write "The Mask." See Byron on epitaphs.
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Peace, peace! he is not dead, he doth not sleep— He hath awakened from the dream of life— 'Tis we, who lost in stormy visions, keep With phantoms an unprofitable strife.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. Adonais, st. 39 (1821). Originally written for John Keats, these lines were recited by Mick Jagger on the death of fellow Rolling Stone Brian Jones, in London's Hyde Park July 5, 1969.
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'Rise like Lions after slumber In unvanquishable number, Shake your chains to earth like dew Which in sleep had fallen on you— Ye are many—they are few.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. The Mask of Anarchy (l. 5-8). . . The Complete Poems of Percy Bysshe Shelley. Mary Shelley, ed. (1994) The Modern Library/Random House.
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He has outsoared the shadow of our night; Envy and calumny and hate and pain, And that unrest which men miscall delight, Can touch him not and torture not again; From the contagion of the world's slow stain He is secure, and now can never mourn A heart grown cold, a head grown grey in vain.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. Adonais, st. 40 (1821). Written for poet John Keats, died aged 25.
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There was no corn—in the wide market-place All loathliest things, even human flesh, was sold; They weighed it in small scales—and many a face Was fixt in eager horror then; his gold The miser brought; the tender maid, grown bold Through hunger, bared her scornèd charms in vain.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. The Revolt of Islam, cto. 10.
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A herd-abandoned deer struck by the hunter's dart
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. Adonais (Fr. XXXIII). . . The Complete Poems of Percy Bysshe Shelley. Mary Shelley, ed. (1994) The Modern Library/Random House.
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'All that is mortal of great Plato there Expiates the joy and woe his master knew not; The star that ruled his doom was far too fair.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. The Triumph of Life (l. 231-233). . . The Complete Poems of Percy Bysshe Shelley. Mary Shelley, ed. (1994) The Modern Library/Random House.
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The soul of Adonais, like a star, Beacons from the abode where the Eternal are.
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. Adonais (Fr. LV). . . The Complete Poems of Percy Bysshe Shelley. Mary Shelley, ed. (1994) The Modern Library/Random House.
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'Or like small gnats and flies, as thick as mist On evening marches, thronged about the brow Of lawyers, statesmen, priest and theorist;—
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. The Triumph of Life (l. 435-437). . . The Complete Poems of Percy Bysshe Shelley. Mary Shelley, ed. (1994) The Modern Library/Random House.
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As long as skies are blue, and fields are green Evening must usher night, night urge the morrow, Month follow month with woe, and year wake year to sorrow
Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), British poet. Adonais (Fr. XXI). . . The Complete Poems of Percy Bysshe Shelley. Mary Shelley, ed. (1994) The Modern Library/Random House.
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