Pierre Corneille Quotes

Oh! how many actions, how many fabulous exploits remain without glory in the midst of the night.
Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. Don Diègue, in The Cid, act 4, sc. 3 (1637). Don Diègue in despair at being too old to fight a duel.
It is only blood that can wash away such an outrage; die or kill.
Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. Don Diègue, in The Cid, act 1, sc. 5 (1637). Don Diègue tells his son to avenge him.
Treachery is noble when aimed at tyranny.
Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. Emilia, in Cinna, act 3, sc. 4 (1641).
A monarch must sometimes rule even himself: he who wants everything must risk very little.
Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. Emperor Titus, in Titus and Berenice (Tite et Bérénice), act 4, sc. 5 (1670).
To die for one's country is such a worthy fate that all compete for so beautiful a death.
Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. Horace, in Horace, act 2, sc. 3 (1641).
The subject of a good tragedy must not be realistic.
Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. Héraclius, preface (1647).
One doesn't wish to see those to whom one owes so much.
Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. King Prusias, in Nicomède, act 2, sc. 1 (1651). The king speaks of his rebellious son.
He has served me too well; by increasing my power he has stolen it away: he is now my subject only so long as he pleases.
Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. King Prusias, in Nicomède, act 2, sc. 1 (1651). The king speaks of his rebellious son, who has won battles on the king's behalf.
He who allows me to rule is in fact my master.
Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. King Prusias, in Nicomède, act 2, sc. 1 (1651).
He who wearies of a king can weary of a father.
Pierre Corneille (1606-1684), French playwright. King Prusias, in Nicomède, act 2, sc. 1 (1651). The king speaks of his rebellious son.